The African and African American Studies program at Northeastern Illinois University is comprised of faculty and instructors from many academic areas throughout higher education. This program not only gives students a solid foundation in African and African American studies, but real world applications and lessons from experience teaching professionals.

Main Campus

Office Hours 8:30 AM to 5:00 PM

Monday - Friday

Northeastern Illinois University
5500 North St. Louis Avenue

Room LWH 2096
Chicago, IL 60625-4699

 

Telephone: (773) 442-4553
Fax: (773) 442-4879
TTY-TTD (Typewriter telephone for the hearing impaired): (773) 442-4999 (incoming only)


(773) 442-4553
Dr. Sharon Bethea
Sharon
L.
Bethea
Counselor Education and Coordinator African/African American Studies Program
Counselor Education
College of Education
Courses Taught
COUN-401 Professional Orientation and Legal/Ethical Practices
COUN-402 Developmental Counseling
COUN-403 Theories of Counseling
COUN-408 Research Seminar
COUN-415 Children and Youth in School and Family Systems
COUN-430 Social and Cultural Diversity in Counseling
ICSE-103 Introduction to Inner City Studies
AFAM-200 Introduction to African/African American Studies
AFAM-301 Foundations of African Civilizations
AFAM-302 Foundations of Africans in the Diaspora
AFAM-303 Global Collaborations: Cross Cultural Research in Ghana
Research Interests
Resiliency of inner city youth; African centered counseling paradigms; social and cultural diversity in counseling; counselor identity development; Oakland Freedom Schools; adolescent civic engagement; study abroad
Education

Ph.D., Educational Psychology
University of Missouri at Columbus

M.A., Clinical Psychology
Specialization: Marriage, Family, Child, and Adolescent Counseling
John F. Kennedy University

B.A., Psychology
San Francisco State University

Selected Publications

Perlow, O., Wheeler, D. I., Bethea, S.L., Scott, B. M. (2018). Black Women's Liberatory Pedagogies: Resistance, Transformation and Healing Within and Beyond the Academy. Switzerland: Palgrave, Macmillan.

Bethea, S. L. (2018). Kuja Nyumbani (Coming Home): Using African-Centered Pedagogy to Educate Black Students in the Academy. In Perlow, O., Wheeler, D. I., Bethea, S.L., Scott, B. M. (eds). Black Women's Liberatory Pedagogies: Resistance, Transformation and Healing Within and Beyond the Academy. Switzerland: Palgrave, Macmillan.

Tavakoli, S., Mei-Whei Chen, M., Zook, N., Bethea, S. L. (2015). Attachment, combat exposure, and post-trauma cognitions as predictors of PTSD and PTG in Veterans.Journal of Military and Government Counseling. (3) 2, 113-130.

Bethea, S. L., Payne, M. (2015). Children’s defense fund: Oakland freedom school.  In Shujaa, M. (Ed.) Encyclopedia of African cultural heritage in North America. Thousand Oaks: Sage.

Perlow, O., Bethea, S., & Wheeler, D.  (2014). Dismantling the master’s house: Black women faculty challenging white privilege/supremacy in the college classroom. Understanding and Dismantling Privilege.   

Bethea, S. L. (2013). Illumination of the Spirit: The evolution of an African centered social justice counselor. In J. Carlson & J. Kottler (Eds.), Helping Beyond the 50-Minute Hour: Therapists Involved in REAL Social Action.  New York: Routledge, 2012.

Bethea, S. L. (2013). Past & present societal influences on black couples that impact sex, love, and intimacy. In K. Helm & J. Carlson (Eds.), Love, Intimacy, Sex and the African American Couple. New York: Routledge.

Bethea, S. L. (2012). The impact of Oakland freedom school’s summer youth program on the psychosocial development of African American youth.  Journal of Black Psychology, 38(4), 442-454.

Bethea, S. L. (2008). A chronology of the education of Black people in Illinois to1874.  Illinois Transatlantic Slave Trade Commission 2008 Report II: v2.

Bethea, S. L. (2008). Writings of Baffour Amakwa Tia II [Asa Hilliard], Ph.D.  Illinois Transatlantic Slave Trade Commission 2008 Report II: v2.

Smith, S. M., & Bethea, S. L. (2004). The emotionally intelligent educator.  NABTE Review, 31, 69-75.

Additional Information

In addition to her teaching responsibilities in the Department of Counselor Education, Dr. Bethea also teaches as an affiliate faculty member in the African/African American and Inner City Studies programs.

Office Hours
Spring 2017 Tuesdays 2:30-3:30 p.m. and 7-8 p.m. Thursdays 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and 7-8 p.m. or by appointment
Main Campus
Russell Benjamin
Russell
Benjamin
Political Science
College of Arts and Sciences
Courses Taught
American National Government
African American Politics and Social Change
Minority Economic Development
Minority Politics in the United States
State Government and Politics
The Politics of Poverty
Foundations of Africans in the Diaspora
Seminar in the American Policy-Making Process
Research Interests
Benjamin’s research focuses upon the politics of race in the United States, especially as they intersect with entrepreneurship, consumerism, colonialism, and the U.S. policy toward the Caribbean. Benjamin has presented his research on the mainland U.S., Hawaii, Mexico, Brazil, Colombia, and in the Caribbean. He has published several book reviews and a journal article. In early 2010, Benjamin, along with Dr. Gregory Hall, co-edited a book, Eternal Colonialism, with the University Press of America. Benjamin will soon publish a book manuscript, African Americans and Recent Policies Toward the Caribbean: Haiti, Cuba, and Puerto Rico, with Caribbean Studies Press.
Education

Ph.D., University of Flori­da, 1996
M.A., University of Florida, 1991
B.A., University of South Caroli­na, 1985

Selected Publications

African Americans and Recent U.S. Policies Toward the Caribbean: Haiti, Cuba, and Puerto Rico. Forthcoming with Caribbean Studies Press.

“Layle Lane.” 2014. Entry in African American National Biography Online. (Oxford University Press.) Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham, editors-in-chief.

Sprague, Jeb. 2012. Paramilitarism and the Assault on Democracy in Haiti. (Monthly Review Press). Forthcoming book review in New Political Science.

“Fifteenth Amendment.” 2010. Entry in The Frederick Douglass Encyclopedia (Greenwood Press). Julius E. Thompson, James L. Conyers, and Nancy J. Dawson, editors.

Eternal Colonialism. Russell Benjamin and Gregory O. Hall (eds). 2010. Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America.

“Introduction.” With Gregory O. Hall. 2010. In Eternal Colonialism, Russell Benjamin and  Gregory O. Hall (eds). Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America.

“The American Internal Colonial Environment.” 2010. In Eternal Colonialism, Russell Benjamin and Gregory O. Hall (eds). Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America.

“Conclusion.” With Gregory O. Hall. 2010. In Eternal Colonialism, Russell Benjamin and Gregory O. Hall (eds). Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America.

Selected Performances

“Problems With American-led Industrial ‘Development’ in Haiti.” Paper Presentation at the 2014 Conference of the Caribbean Studies Association, Merida, Mexico, May 26-30.

“Bill Clinton, Hillary Rodham Clinton, and Haitian Economic `Development’.” Paper presented at the 2013 Conference of the Caribbean Studies Association, Grand Anse, Grenada, June 3-7.

“American ‘Development’ of Haiti After the 2010 Earthquake.” Paper presented at the 2nd NEIU African and African American Research Symposium, Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, April 11, 2013.

“Wal-Mart and the Congressional Black Caucus: Mutual Interests?” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists, Oak Brook, Illinois, March 13-16, 2013.

“Internal Colonialism and Black Political Support for Black Business Development.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists, Raleigh, North Carolina, March 16-19, 2011.

 

 

Office Hours
TBA
Main Campus
Curriculum Vitae
Chielozona Eze
Chielozona
Eze
English
College of Arts and Sciences
Courses Taught
ENGL 201 World of Poetry
ENGL 222 English Literature, 1750-Present
ENGL 203 World of Fiction
ENGL 334 Biblical Backgrounds English & American Literature
ENGL 345 Practical Criticism
ENGL 383/483 Post Colonial African Literature
ENGL 480 Ethnic Literatures
ENGL 488 Africana Literature
ENGL 381 African-American Literature
Also Literary and Cultural Theories,Postcolonial Literature, Global Literature
Research Interests
Narrative theory, Globalization and Cultures, Feminism in Global Contexts
Education

Ph.D.  English/Philosophy, Purdue University, 2003
MFA    Fiction, Purdue University, 2003
M.A.    Comparative Literature/German, University of Bayreuth, Germany, 1996
M.A.    Catholic Theology, Leopold Franzens University, Austria, 1989
B.A.     Philosophy (Magna cum laude), St. Joseph’s Seminary, Nigeria, 1984

Selected Publications

Books

Ethics and Human Rights in Anglophone African Women's Literature - Feminist Empathy  New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2016.

Postcolonial Imagination and Moral Representations in African Literature and Culture. Lanham: Lexington Books (Rowman and Littlefield), 2011.

 The Dilemma of Ethnic Identity: Alain Locke’s Vision of Transcultural Societies. New York: Edwin Mellen Press, 2005.

Articles

"Decolonisation and its Discontents: Thoughs on the Postcolonial African Moral Self" Journal of South African Philosophy, Vol 34. Issue 4 (2015): 408-418.

“Rethinking African Culture and Identity: The Afropolitan Model.” Journal of African Cultural Studies. 26. 2. (2014): 234-247.

“The Open Wounds of Being: The Poetics of Testimony in the Works of Patricia Jabbeh Wesley.”  Interdisciplinary Literary Studies. Vol. 16, No.2 (Fall 2014): 282-306.

“Death, Here I Am: Violence and Redemption in Zakes Mda’s Ways of Dying.” Journal of Narrative Theory, 43.1. (Spring 2013): 87-107.

“Nelson Mandela and the Politics of Empathy: Reflections on the Moral Conditions for Conflict Resolutions in Africa.” African Conflict & Peacebuilding Review. Volume 2, Number 1, (Spring 2012): 122-135.

“Ambits of Moral Judgement: Of Pain, Empathy and Redemption in J.M.Coetzee's Age of Iron,” Journal of Literary Studies, 27:4, (2011):17-35.

“African Feminism: Resistance or Resentment." Quest: An African Journal of Philosophy XX, 1-2, (2008): 97-117.

“The Pitfalls of Cultural Consciousness.” Philosophia Africana 10. 1 (March 2007): 37-47.

“Cosmopolitan Solidarity: Negotiating Transculturality in Contemporary Nigerian Novels.” English in Africa. (Spring 2005):99-112.

“Resentment and the African Condition: An Inquiry.” Gefame: Journal of African Studies. 2, no. 1, 2005.

Creative Works

The Trial of Mugabe (Novella) Chicago, Okri Books, 2009.

Survival Kit (Poems) New York:  Akachic Books, 2016.

Office Hours
Summer 2017 No Office Hours
Main Campus
Curriculum Vitae
Alan David Farmer
Alvin
David
Farmer
Jr.
Associate Professor
Psychology
Gerontology
African and African American Studies
College of Arts and Sciences
Expertise
Clinical Psychology
Courses Taught
Abnormal Psychology
Psychology of Personality
Psychopathology of Childhood
Theory and Methods of Individual Therapy
Introduction to Group Therapy
Research Interests
My research interests are in the area of children at risk for the development of behavior problems. My goal is to generate a body of empirical work that will contribute to theory on the development of conduct problems. I am especially interested in examining the effectiveness of evidence based clinical interventions with Disruptive Behavior Disorders. My research lab offers students opportunities for independent studies focusing on interventions with children with Disruptive Behavior Disorders. Students working with me learn to score clinical measures, manage data sets, and receive training in working with clinical populations. I also supervise field experiences that are identified by students.
Education

PhD

Background

Child and Family Clinical Psychologist

Office Hours
By appointment. Please email.
Main Campus
Courtney Francis
Courtney
L.
Francis
Instructor, Undergraduate Clinical Advisor
Social Work
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
English Language Program
College of Arts and Sciences
Expertise
Mentorship of College Students in TESL Clinical Experience; Social Work Research and Evaluation
Courses Taught
ELP 099 - Developmental Writing
SWK 304 - Social Work Practice I
SWK 306 - HBSE II
SWK 309 - Research and Quantitative Applications in Social Work
SWK 310 - Research Practicum I
SWK 311 - Research Practicum II
TESL 330 - Language, Society and Education
TESL 340 - Practices and Procedures
TESL 341 - Principles of Language Teaching
TESL 399 - Clinical Experience in Teaching English as a Second Language
Research Interests
Social Work Systems, Social Work Program Evaluation, Programmatic Impact of Family Social Work Programs on Vulnerable Communities, Impact of Dialect on Academic Writing, History of and Societal Interface with African American Vernacular English, Language Contact, ESL policy in American Schools, Effective Methods of Teaching Writing in Inner City Schools.
Education

Bachelor’s Degree: Brown University, Major: Economics, Minor: Urban Studies.

Master’s Degree: University of Chicago, Social Service Administration and Policy.

Master’s Degree: Northeastern Illinois University, Teaching English as a Second Language.  

Background

Former elementary school principal on Chicago’s West Side; former program manager at Healthy Families Illinois Program; former Instructor at Robert Morris University; former program director at Drug Free Schools and taught  ESL at the Northeastern El Centro campus in the Community Program for four semesters.

 

Additional Information

Courtney  Francis is a native of NYC and graduate of Brown University (Providence, RI), who came to Chicago for graduate school. Her BA is in Economics with a minor in Urban Studies. Courtney holds a Master's degree from University of Chicago in Social Service Administration and Policy, with a focus in Program Management and Administration. She is one class away from an MA in TESL/Applied Linguistics, here at NEIU. Her academic interests include language contact, American English dialect, research in Innovative ESL teaching methods, and English language learner interface with native English speakers in urban settings. Outside interests include swimming, art appreciation, researching her family history, and spending time with her husband, and their  four children, aged 10-20.

In TESL, Courtney Francis teaches TESL 399 (TESL Clinical Experience) and TESL 340 (Practices and Procedures). She also teaches Developmental Writing and select courses in the Social Work Department and taught four semesters of ESL at the Northeastern El Centro campus.

Office Hours
Tuesday & Thursday 1:30 p.m.-2:30 p.m. Wednesday 2:00 p.m. -3:00 p.m. and by appointment.
Main Campus
Nicole E. Holland
Nicole
E.
Holland
Educational Inquiry and Curriculum Studies
African and African American Studies
College of Arts and Sciences
College of Education
Courses Taught
EDFN 306: Education and Individual Difference
EDFN 307: Psychology of Instruction and Learning
EDFN 406: Human Development and Learning
EDFN 407: Learning Theory and Educational Practice
EDFN 416: Cultural Pluralism
LEAD 429: Educational Research
Research Interests
Race, Class, and Education, Access, Equity, and Excellence in Education, Educational Policy, School Reform, and Educators’ Professional Preparation, Practice and Development
Education

Ph.D., Social-Personality Psychology, 1997
The Graduate School and University Center of the City University of New York, New York

M.A., Social Psychology, 1994
Hunter College of the City University of New York, New York

B.A., Psychology Major; Women’s Studies Minor, 1988
Hamilton College, Clinton, New York

Selected Publications

Holland, N. E.  (2011)."The Power of Peers: Influences on Postsecondary Education Planning and Experiences of African American Students" in Urban Education, Volume 46, Issue 5, September, 2011, pp.1029-1055.

Holland, N. E. (2011). “Lessons Learned: Influences of Human Capital in Urban Students’ High School-to-College Transitions.”inIllinois Committee on Black Concerns in Higher Education (ICBCHE) journal issue, Linking the Educational Pipeline: From Pre-K to College and Beyond, Volume 26, Number 1, pp. 32-45.

Holland, N. E. (2010). “Postsecondary Education Preparation of Traditionally Underrepresented College Students: A Social Capital Perspective.”  Journal of Diversity in Higher Education, Volume 3, Number 2, pp.111-125.

Holland, N. E.and Farmer-Hinton, R. L. (2009). “Leave No Schools Behind: The Importance of a College Culture in Urban Public High Schools.”  The High School Journal, Volume 92, Number 3, pp. 24-43.

Farmer-Hinton, R. L. and Holland, N. E. (2008).“The Influence of High School Size on Access to Postsecondary Information, Conversations, and Activities.”  American Secondary Education, Volume 37, Number 1, pp. 41-61.

Holland, N. E. (2008)Déjà Vu: Segregation and Inequality in America’s Public Schools.” The Sophist’s Bane, Volume Four, Numbers One and Two, pp.20-29.

Holland, N.E.(2008)“Refocusing Educational Assessments on Teaching and Learning, Not Politics” The Educational Forum, Volume 72, Number 3, 215-226.

Holland, N. E.(2007)“Reflections on Urban High School Students’ Post-Secondary Transitions:  A Theoretical Capital Perspective.”  The International Journal of Innovative Higher Education.  Volume 20, June 2007, pp 25-33.

Holland, N.E. (2006).  “Documenting Data:  Infusing Research Strategies Into Field-Based, Teacher Training Activities.”  Teaching & Learning: The Journal of Naturalistic and Reflective Practice, v21 (1), pp 5-28.

Holland, N. E. (2002). “Small Schools: Transforming Teacher and Student Experiences in Urban High Schools, Chapter 3 in Reforming Chicago’s High Schools: Research Perspectives on School and System Level Change edited by Valerie E. Lee.  Consortium on Chicago School Research.  Chicago, Illinois.

Wasley, P.A., Fine, M., Gladden, M., Holland, N.E., King, S.P., Mosak, E., and Powell, L.C. (2000).  Small Schools: Great Strides -- A Study of New Small Schools in Chicago. Bank Street College of Education.  New York, New York.

Background

Dr. Holland is a trained social psychologist who has conducted research in the fields of pre-school, elementary, secondary, and higher education.  Her areas of interest include educational equity, educational policy, school reform, teacher training, community and professional development in schools, particularly as these areas influence conditions that promote success for the educationally disadvantaged. Dr. Holland’s current research explores the individual and institutional factors that affect urban, public high school students’ preparation for and enrollment in four-year colleges and universities.

Additional Information

Selected Presentations

Holland, N. E. (April, 2011).  "Paving Postsecondary Education Pathways for Students of Color: Individual and Institutional Responsibilities." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association.  New Orleans, Louisiana.

Holland, N. E. (April, 2011).  "Beyond Conventional Wisdom: African American Students Discuss Sources of Support for College Preparation and Success." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association.  New Orleans, Louisiana.

Holland, N. E. (January, 2010). “It Still Takes A Village: From Urban Public High School Graduate to University Student.”  Paper presented at the 7th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Education. Honolulu, Hawaii.

Holland, N. E. (April, 2008). “College Knowledge: How Human and Social Capital Influence Students’ Postsecondary Transitions.”  Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association.  New York, New York.

Holland, N.E. (November, 2006). “Becoming Better Consumers of Educational Research.”  Panelist for the presentation, Learning to Lead: Preparing Tomorrow’s Educational Leaders at the International Leadership Association 8th Annual Conference.  Chicago, Illinois.

Holland, N. E. (April, 2006) ...And Yes, School Size Matters: Creating Communities for Teaching and Learning.  American Educational Research Association‘s annual meeting. San Francisco, California.

Holland, N.E. (June, 2006).  Promising Partnerships:  Preparing Urban High School Students for Success in Four-Year Colleges and Universities. Paper presented at the International Council for Innovation in Higher Education’s annual meeting. Panama City, Panama.

Holland, N. E. (August, 2006). It Still Takes A Village: Institutional and Individual Supports Necessary to Support Post-Secondary Transitions.  Education Summit:  Chicago Public Schools Post-Secondary Transitions.  Chicago, Illinois.

Holland, N. E. (October, 2006).  Chartering Education:   Critical Reflections on Charter School Experiences.  Phi Delta Kappa International’s annual conference.  Washington, DC.

Holland, N.E. (November, 2006).  Becoming Better Consumers of Educational Research.  International Leadership Association’s annual meeting.  Chicago, Illinois.

Office Hours
Tuesdays 2:30–4:00 p.m.; Wednesdays 3:00-4:00 p.m. and by appointment
Main Campus
Gilo Kwesi Logan
Gilo Kwesi
C.
Logan
Ed.D.
Justice Studies
College of Arts and Sciences
Expertise
Mission-driven diversity management, incorporating culturally relevant pedagogy/multicultural education, developing cultural competencies, the impact of culture on teaching and learning; race, class and gender issues, and transformative learning. Also success strategies for all students, first-generation college students, and racial/ethnic identity development.
Courses Taught
JUST 101 Introduction to Social Justice
JUST 332 Race & Ethnic Relations
Research Interests
Ethnic identity development & transformative learning; the intersection of ethnicity, race, gender, and class; the impact of culture on learning and teaching styles; and the African-American experience in predominately white suburbs and institutions.
Education

• Ed.D., Adult Education, National Louis University, Chicago, Illinois, 2011
• M.A., Elementary Education, National Louis University, Chicago, Illinois, 1993
• B.S., Business Administration, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois, 1989

Background

Dr. Logan is an internationally recognized diversity consultant, educator, writer, and speaker.  His mission is to help individuals and organizations meet the challenges of working and living in a global society.  He is a certified diversity practitioner, diversity columnist for the Fiji Sun, member of the National Diversity Council, and also serves as adjunct faculty of diversity and social justice at Harper College in Palatine, Illinois.  Dr. Logan is a culturally focused world traveler, with seven years of personal travel experience living in 23 countries throughout North and Central America, the Caribbean, South Pacific, Southeast Asia, India, the Middle East, and West Africa.

PARTIAL MEDIA LIST: Featured on numerous television/radio broadcasts, including Financial Survival Network, CLTV (Chicago, USA), On The Street, Kiora FM (New Zealand), Mali FM (Mali), and the Chicago Korean Radio Broadcasting Co.  In print, he has written for and been quoted by the Chicago Sun-Times, Ebony, Cosmopolitan, N'Digo Magapaper, The Daily Northwestern, The Evanston Roundtable, and the Fiji Sun.  Dr. Logan has been featured in the video gallery of the Chicago Tribune for the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech. 

Additional Information

NEIU Alternative Spring Break Boarder Awareness Immersion Experience, Faculty/Staff leader, 2010-2012: led three groups of students--one to San Miguel, Guatemala, to study fair-trade arrangements surrounding coffee production from seed to cup; and two to the Tucson, AZ/Nogales, Mexico and El Paso, TX/Juarez, Mexico borders to study issues related to human rights, immigration, and the border.

Interfaith Peace-Builders participant, 2012 African Heritage Delegation to Palestine/Israel (October 2012): the delegration emphasized the grassroots voices of Israelis and Palestinians immersed in the reality of the conflict, bearing witness to the everyday violence of war and occupation, and learning from those committed to nonviolent struggle, human rights, and peace with justice.

Office Hours
Fall 2015 Tuesday and Thursday 9:30-11:30 a.m. and by appointment.
Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies
Main Campus
Curriculum Vitae
Tracy Luedke
Tracy
J.
Luedke
Coordinator, Global Studies Program
Anthropology
College of Arts and Sciences
Expertise
Cultural Anthropology, African Studies, Global Studies
Courses Taught
ANTH 212 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
ANTH/AFAM 224 - Contemporary African Culture
ANTH 290 - Graduating Anthropology
ANTH 307 - Anthropology of Gender, Sexuality, and the Body
ANTH 317 - Medical Anthropology
ANTH/AFAM 320 - Religion in Africa
ANTH 375 - Anthropology of Globalization
ANTH 377 - Anthropology of Television
ZHON 360 - Honors Seminar in Research and Creative Processes
GS 201 - Introduction to Global Studies I
AFAM 303 - Global Collaborations-Ghana
Research Interests
Religion, healing, southern Africa, globalization, immigration, transportation My research concerns the Christianized healing practices of the prophets of central Mozambique, a network of people possessed by biblical spirits who work to heal individual bodies afflicted with illness as well as social bodies recovering from the effects of warfare and dislocation. I recently collaborated on an edited volume about healing in southeastern Africa. The book addresses the important relationship between African healing practices and borders of various sorts, which healers both transgress and reify in the course of their work. I am also interested in material culture, especially the ways objects, buildings, and other materialities figure in healing practices.
Education

Ph.D., Cultural Anthropology, Indiana University, 2005

M.A., Cultural Anthropology, Indiana University, 1999

 

Selected Publications

Luedke, Tracy. 2014. “Health, Illness, and Healing in African Society.” In Africa, 4th Edition, edited by Patrick O’Meara, John Hanson, and Maria Grosz-Ngate. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.

Luedke, Tracy. 2011. “Intimacy and Alterity: Prophetic Selves and Spirit Others in Central Mozambique.” Journal of Religion in Africa  41(2):154-179.

Luedke, Tracy. 2007. “Spirit and Matter: The Materiality of Mozambican Prophet Healing.” Journal of Southern African Studies 33(4): 715-31. Special Issue: Histories of Healing, edited by Lyn Schumaker, Diana Jeater, and Tracy Luedke.

Luedke, Tracy J. 2006. “Presidents, Bishops, and Mothers: The Construction of Authority in Mozambican Healing.” In Borders and Healers: Brokering Therapeutic Resources in Southeast Africa, edited by Tracy J. Luedke and Harry G. West. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

West, Harry G. and Tracy J. Luedke. 2006. “Healing Divides: Therapeutic Border Work in Southeast Africa.” In Borders and Healers: Brokering Therapeutic Resources in Southeast Africa, edited by Tracy J. Luedke and Harry G. West. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Office Hours
Fall 2018 Office Hours: M 3:15-5:15 PM, T 4-5:15 PM, W 2-2:45 PM
Main Campus
Ngwe
Job
E.
Ngwe
PhD
Curriculum Specialist: Research
Social Work
College of Arts and Sciences
Expertise
Prevention Resource
Courses Taught
SWK 202: Community Analyses
SWK 309: Research and Quantitative Applications in Social Work
SWK 310: Practicum I
SWK 311: Practicum II
Research Interests
Youth violence prevention, youth development
Education

Ph.D. (PUBLIC HEALTH), M.Ed. (EDUCATION), B.Ed. (EDUCATION)

Selected Publications

Ngwe, J. E. (2013). Social Work Research Methods: An Invitation. Boston, MA: Pearson publishing company (ISBN-13: 978-1-269-56132-7. USA: Pearson publishing company

Ngwe, J. E. (2011). Social Work Research Practicum: A Step-by-Step Planning Handbook (Second edition). Boston, MA: Pearson publishing company (ISBN 0-536-29551-4). USA: Pearson publishing company

Ngwe, J. E. (2010). Social Work Research Practicum II: A User-friendly Data Analysis and Statistics Handbook (Second edition). USA: Pearson publishing company

Ngwe, J. E. (2007). Social Work Research Practicum II: A User-friendly Data Analysis and Statistics Handbook”. Boston, MA: Pearson publishing company (ISBN 0-536-338-124)

Ngwe, J. E. (2006). Social Work Research Practicum: A Step-by-Step Planning Handbook. Boston, MA: Pearson publishing company (ISBN 0-536-29551-4).

Ngwe, J. E. & Elechi, O. O. (2013). Human Trafficking: The modern day slavery of the 21st century. African Journal of Criminology and Justice Studies: AJCJS, 6 (1 & 2): 95-112

Elechi, O. O., Okosun, T. Y. & Ngwe, J. E. (2007). Factors Vitiating Against the Effectiveness of the Nigerian Police in Combating the Criminal Exploitation of Children and Women. African Journal of Criminology & Justice Studies (AJCJS), 3(1): 1-49.

Eisuke, S., Ngwe, J. E., & Flay, B. R. (2005). Evaluation of the effects of the Aban Aya Youth Project in reducing violence among African American adolescent males using Latent Class Growth Mixture Modeling Techniques. Evaluation Review: A Journal of Applied Social Research, 29(2): 128-148.

Ngwe, J. E., Li, Q., Flay, B. R., & Eisuke, S. (2004).  Violence prevention among African American Adolescent Males: Test of mediating mechanisms. American Journal of Health Behavior, 28(Supplement 1): 24-37.

Ngwe, J. E. (1999). Peer Mediation in Elementary Schools: Toward a comprehensive framework. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation. University of Illinois at Chicago, Illinois

Ngwe, J. E. (1987). Assessment of education needs of health educators in Manitoba,                 

            Unpublished master's thesis, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.

Ngwe, J. E. (1987). Education Needs of Health Educators in Manitoba.  Journal of Education Administration and Foundation, 2 (1): 55-60   (ED# 164 746)

Office Hours
Tuesdays and Thursdays: 11:00 - 1:00 pm
Main Campus
silhouette woman
Wamucii
Njogu
Dean, Sociology and Associate Professor
College of Arts and Sciences
Expertise
Sociology
Education

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin (Madison)

Background

Njogu, Wamucii is Dean and Associate Professor  of the College of Arts and Sciences at Northeastern Illinois University. 

Office Hours
By Appointment only
Jeanine Ntihirageza
Jeanine
Ntihirageza
Ph.D.
Department Chair, Coordinator
Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
College of Arts and Sciences
Expertise
Phonology, Morphology, African Languages (Bantu Languages), Contact Linguistics, Language Teaching Methodology, ESL / EFL African Summer Institute
Courses Taught
TESL 426-Advanced Linguistic Analysis
Research Interests
Department Chair, Anthropology, Philosophy, Teaching English as a Second.Foreign Language, & Academic Literacy Program Coordinator, African Summer Institute
Education

Ph.D. in Linguistics, University of Chicago

Selected Publications

Bofman, Theodora,Jeanine Ntihirageza, and Paul Prez. “Writing a bilingual learner’s dictionary:  A case study of Kirundi.”  In English Learners’ Dictionaries at the DSNA 2009. Ilan J. Kernerman and Paul Bogaards, eds. Tel Aviv: K Dictionaries Ltd. 2010.

Background

Jeanine Ntihirageza (Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL) holds a PhD in Linguistics from the University of Chicago, with a specialization in Bantu languages. She has an MA in Applied Linguistics from Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.  She received her BA in English Language and Literature from the University of Burundi where she subsequently taught TEFL and ESL classes as a Lecturer.  She came to the United States on a Fulbright Scholarship to do her graduate studies.  Her primary research area is phonology and morphology.  Her other research interests include contact linguistics and Pragmatics.  In addition, she is a currently working on an online bilingual Kirundi-English dictionary with Teddy Bofman and Paul Prez (http://homepages.neiu.edu/~kirundi/dictionary/ )  She is an Associate Professor at Northeastern Illinois University, and Department chair of Anthropology, English Language Program (ELP), Philosophy, and Teaching English as a Second/Foreign Language (TESL).  She is also on the core faculty of the African and African American Studies program. She has taught Theoretical and Applied Linguistics for the last 13 years. She spearheaded a Genocide Research Group that recently organized a symposium on Silencing Genocide in Africa and African Diaspora.

Office Hours
M 10 a.m.-6 p.m. T, W, R 10 a.m.-3 p.m. and by appointment.
Main Campus
Professor T.Y. Okosun
T.Y.
Okosun
Ph.D.
Department Chair (Interim)
Justice Studies
College of Arts and Sciences
Expertise
Governance and political power Local and global destitution Intersections: Africans and African Americans Conflict scenarios and transformation Colonial / Post-colonial legacies Dictatorships, democracy, and vapid insatiality
Courses Taught
JUST 101 Introduction to Social Justice
JUST 202 WIP: Justice and Inequality
JUST 241 Research Methods in Justice Studies
JUST 301Theories of Justice and Social Change
JUST 312 Theories of Criminal Behavior
JUST 315O Haitian Revolution
JUST 343 Conflict Transformation
JUST 345 Practicum in Justice Studies
JUST 350 Field Work Seminar
JUST 362 Justice Issues in Africa
Research Interests
Conflict resolution
Education

• Ph.D., Conflict Analysis and Resolution, Nova Southeastern University, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
• L.Th., Saint Paul University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
• M.M.R.Sc., Catholic University of Leuven (KU Leuven), Leuven, Belgium
• M.A., Religious Studies, Catholic University of Leuven (KU Leuven), Leuven, Belgium
• B.Th., Pontifical Urban University, Rome, Italy

Office Hours
Fall 2016: Tuesday 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Main Campus, 2-4 p.m. El Centro.
Main Campus
Olivia Perlow
Olivia
Perlow
Women & Gender Studies Coordinator, Associate Professor of Sociology
Sociology
African and African American Studies
Women's and Gender Studies
College of Arts and Sciences
Courses Taught
SOC 100: Introduction to Sociology
SOC 245: WIP: Social Inequalities
SOC 316: Race and Ethnicity
SOC 350: Social Structure in Black Communities
Research Interests
I currently serve as an Assistant Professor of Sociology, and am also core faculty of the African and African American Studies Program at Northeastern Illinois University. I have taught courses such as Race and Ethnicity, Introduction to Sociology, Social Structure in Black Communities, and Policing in Black Communities. My research interests include the impact of globalization on the feminization of poverty on a global scale, policing and social control in black communities, the socio-historical analysis of white privilege in America, and American identity among African-Americas. I have experience in survey and evaluation research projects, with both qualitative and quantitative foci. I have received teaching fellowships from both Northwestern University and Texas State University. I was also the recipient of the Hines Small Research Grant in Mental Health from the Mental Health Association of the District of Columbia.
Education

Ph.D., Sociology, 2008, Howard University

M.A., Sociology, 2004, Howard University

B.A., Sociology, 2000, Howard University

Office Hours
TBA
Main Campus
Barbara Scott
BarBara
Scott
Professor Emeritus
Sociology
Women's and Gender Studies
African and African American Studies
College of Arts and Sciences
Expertise
Marriages and Families, Africana (aka Black) Women's Studies, Sociology of Racism, Race and Ethnic Relations, Sociology of Gender; Social Inequalities; Social Justice and Resistance; Race, Racism and White Privilege; Popular Culture, Critical Race Theory, Feminist/Womanist Theory, and HIV/AIDS in African American Communities. I have also developed and teach a course annually entitled: African American Women: Feminism, Race and Resistance.
Courses Taught
AFAM 109: First Year Experience: Exploring Africa In Chicago
AFAM 200: Introduction to African and African Studies
SOC 344: Afric. Amer. Women: Feminism, Race, Resistance
Research Interests
By most definitions I am a generalist. However, I have strong interests in a number of areas including HIV/AIDS in Black Communities, institutional racism, Black migration and patterns of residential settlement, Black Folk Lore, African Cultural Continuities in African American Families, Black Women and Upward Mobility, and Media and Society. Indeed, one of my long-time teaching interests has revolved around the use of media, especially literature and film, in teaching sociology and an ongoing research interest in the sociological relationships within and between modern media and modern culture. In particular, I am interested in what popular culture and the media tell us about the social structures (especially race, class, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and generational differences), the social processes, and the everyday life of postmodern American society. Current Research Activities Co-editing (with Marcia Segal) 6th edition of Race, Gender, and Class in Sociology:Toward an Inclusive Curriculum. Washington, DC: The American Sociological Association Press. Collecting data on Parents with Adult Children Living at Home Conducting Case Studies of African American Women Living With HIV/AIDS Working on a series of edited white papers on the Impact of Hurricane Katrina on the Black Community
Education

Ph.D., Sociology, 1988, Northwestern University

M.Ph., Community College Education, 1975, Roosevelt University

M.A., Sociology, 1975, Roosevelt University

B.A., Sociology, 1971, Roosevelt University

Selected Publications

Schwartz, Mary Ann and Scott, BarBara M. 2007. Marriages and Families: Diversity and Change. 5th edition, Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Scott, BarBara M. and Schwartz, M.A. 2006. Sociology: Making Sense of the Social World. 2nd edition. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Lemelle, Anthony, Jr., and Scott, BarBara M. 2006. "African American HIV/AIDS and Social Institutions: New Realities Calling for New Policies." In Juan Battle, Michael Bennett, and Anthony Lemelle (Eds.), Free At Last?: Black America in the Twenty-First Century. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction. pp. 103-126.

Scott, BarBara, Misra, Joya, & Segal, Marcia. 2003. Race, Gender, and Class in Sociology:Toward an Inclusive Curriculum. (5th ed.). Washington, DC: The American Sociological Association Press.

Selected Performances

Annual Workshop. 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005. "Teaching Sociology Through Literature and Film." Midwest Sociological Society, Midwest Sociologists for Women in Society Annual Meetings.

Organizer/Presider. 2005. "Intersections of Race, Class, and Gender in the Media." Midwest Sociological Society, Midwest Sociologists for Women in Society Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, MN.

Staged Reading and Discussion (with Martha Thompson). 2005. "Working Class Women Sleuths Clean Up!!-Blanche White Meets Lily Bard: Gender, Race, Class, and Sexuality in Women's Dectective Fiction." Midwest Sociological Society, Midwest Sociologists for Women in Society Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, MN.

Symposium Participant. 2003. "HIV/AIDS Intervention for Women with Multiple Sexual Partners Living in Impoverished Housing." University of Wisconsin/Milwaukee, Hefter Center.

Additional Information

Recent Professional Service and Community Involvement

President (2005-2006), Association of Black Sociologists

Co-Chair (Current), NEIU Presidential Task Force on the Millennium Student

Volunteer Faculty, St. Leonard's Alternative High School for Ex-Offenders

Member, Links, Inc. Services to African American Youth Projects

Mentor, Northeastern Illinois University, Minority Mentor Program

Mentor, Sister-to-Sister Mentor Advisory Group

Chair, Advisory Committee on Student Retention, Northeastern Illinois University

Board Member: Ora Higgins Youth Foundation

Member, American Sociological Association; Midwest Sociological Society; and Midwest Sociologists for Women in Society (MSWS)

Office Hours
N/A
Main Campus
Marshall Thompson
Marshall
Thompson
Political Science Chair
Political Science
College of Arts and Sciences
Expertise
Comparative Politics, Democratic Institutions, Political Economy, State Consolidation, African Politics
Courses Taught
AFAM 200: Intro to African & African American Studies
PSCI 210: Intro to Political Science
PSCI 251: Comparative Political Systems
PSCI 360: Politics of sub-Saharan Africa
PSCI 372: Democracy, Responsiveness, & Accountability
PSCI 378: International Political Economy
PSCI 460: Comparative Democratic Institutions
PSCI 465: Seminar in African Politics
PSCI 483: International Political Economy
Research Interests
State Consolidation, Party Systems, Political Executives, Inter-branch Relations, Economic Inequality, Ethiopian and Kenyan Politics.
Education

Ph.D. & A.M, Washington University in St. Louis
B.A., University of South Carolina

Selected Publications

Sened, Itai, Marshall Thompson, and Robert Walker. 2013. “The State, Property Rights, and the Middle Class: Empirical Support for an Aristotlean Observation.” The Indiana Journal of Political Science 14: 61-85.

Sened, Itai, Marshall Thompson, Robert Walker, and Ron Watson. 2010. “The Middle Class: A New Conceptual Framework and a Brief Application to the Caucasus.” The Caucasus and Globalization 4(Issue 1-2): 106-117.

Thompson, Marshall. 2009. “Parties, Presidents, and State Consolidation: Cross-National Evidence with Illustrations from Kenya.” African and Asian Studies 8(4): 345-374.

Thompson, Marshall. 2009. “Research, Identities, and Praxis: The Tensions of Integrating Identity into the Field Experience.” PS: Political Science & Politics 42(April):325-328.

Thompson, Marshall. 2006. “Advocating Stronger Legislatures as a Precursor to Stronger States in Africa.” The OSSREA Bulletin 3(3): 16-24.

Office Hours
Wednesdays and Thursday, noon - 2 p.m.
Main Campus
Curriculum Vitae
Waddell
Donald
M
Waddell
Instructor
Social Work
African and African American Studies
College of Arts and Sciences
Expertise
I have worked in the Social Service field for over 20+ years. I earned my undergraduate degree in Communications in 1988 from Wilberforce University and earned my Master’s degree in Social Work in 2001 from The University of Chicago. In these years in the Social Service field I have served a wide range of underserved populations. I have expertise and extensive experience in individual/group counseling/therapy, workshops, trainings, consulting and program/curriculum development
Courses Taught
SWK 200: Intro to Social Work
SWK 250: Issues in Social Service Delivery
SWK 250: Social Work Issues and Delivery Models/African American Males
SWK 303: HBSE I
SWK 304: Practice I
SWK 305: Practice II
SWK 314: Social Work Advocacy
SWK 327: Social Work with Families
SWK 328: Social Work with Groups
SWK 353: Field Seminar I
SWK 354: Field Seminar II
SWK 356: Practicum II
AFAM 200: Intro to African/African American Studies
Research Interests
African American Fathers Diabetes, Youth, Headstart
Education

Wilberforce University (BA) The University of Chicago (MA)

Selected Publications

IMAGES: A Collection of Poetry featuring poems by D. Maurice Waddell Volume 1 is available on Amazon.com and createspace.com/3717413



DONSONGS: An Anthology of Literary Sound Volume 2 is available on https://www.createspace.com/4126373


365: Imprints of a Beautiful Mind 
Volume 3 http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss/191-0607373-2363401?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=365+imprints+of+a+beautiful+mind+by+d+Maurice+Waddell

Office Hours
MW 11am-2pm, TR 2pm-3pm
Main Campus
Curriculum Vitae
Durene Wheeler
Durene
Wheeler
Educational Inquiry and Curriculum Studies
African and African American Studies
College of Arts and Sciences
College of Education
Courses Taught
ED P&L 259: Learning and Motivation Strategies for Success in College
EDU 201: Education and Society; EDU 206: Educational Psychology
EDFN 305: Philosophical and Historical Foundations of Public Education
EDFN 307: Psychology of Instruction and Learning
EDFN 314B/WSP 311C: Power, Knowledge & Communities: Feminists Engagements with Education
AFAM 301: African Civilizations
FYE 109: Schooling in Chicago: Communities, Public Education and Change
ED P&L 812: American School and Society
EDFN 416: Cultural Pluralism in Schools
EDFN 405: Development of Educational Thought
ELAD 429: Research in Education
Research Interests
Educational History of African Americans and Women Cultural and Social Foundations of Education History of Higher Education Feminist Perspectives in Higher Education Role of the School in the Social Order Education for Liberation Educational Policy Studies Black Women and the Civil Rights Movement Black Feminist Thought Social Justice Curriculum of HBCU's 1940s-1970s Research Design/Methods
Education

2004
Ph.D.
Cultural and Social Foundations in Education, The Ohio State University Counseling Psychology, The Ohio State University

1996
M.A.
Educational Policy and Leadership/Student Affairs with minor in Counseling Psychology, The Ohio State University

1989
B.A.
Studio Art, The College of Wooster

Selected Publications

Wheeler, D. (2008). “Answering the Call: Influencing Equity in Education through Teacher Preparation”. The Sophist Bane 4(1&2), 63-68. 

Durene Wheeler, co-author, T. King et al, "Andrea's Third Shift: The Invisible Work of African American Women in Higher Education, pp. 403-415" in This Bridge We Call Home: Radical Visions for Transformation, Gloria Anzaldua and AnaLouise Keating, eds. New York: Routledge 2002.

Book Review Beverly Lindsay and Manuel J. Justiz, Eds. The Quest for Equity in Higher Education: Toward New Paradigms in an Evolving Affirmative Action Era. Albany: State University of New York Press, 2001. Journal of African American Men v(6) n(4) pp.86-88

Background

2006-Present 
Assistant, Associate Professor Northeastern Illinois University

September 2005 - June 2006
Visiting Scholar, Center for Comparative Studies in Race and Ethnicity, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA

September 2003 - June 2005
Assistant Professor, School of Education, Russell Sage College, Troy, NY.

September 2001 - June 2002
Instructor, Academic Learning Center, Department of Educational Policy and Leadership, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH.

Additional Information

Awards/Grants:

Entrepreneurialism: A Study of Collective Action and Entrepreneurship Among African Americans, Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation, 2006-2009.

Presentations:
 

The Continued Search for Sisterhood: The Contemporary Marginalization of African and African American Women in Women's Studies Panel Discussion with Olivia Perlow, BarBara Scott, & Wamucii Njogu at Oakton Community College, Women and Gender Studies Conference, April 2011

Changes and Collaborations: Are Leadership Transitions Difficult Dialogue? Roundtable with Laurie Fuller, Ellen O'Brien, Ann Russo, & Beth S. Catlett at National Women's Studies Conference, November 2010.

Sunrise Over Fallujah/Question of War at the Young Adult Literature Conference St. Charles, IL October 2009 

Training Socially Just and Culturally Responsive Teachers: An Integrated Content-based Modelat the 6th International Conference on Teacher Education and Social Justice Chicago, IL December 2009 

Office Hours
Spring ’14 Sabbatical
Main Campus
Lance Williams
Lance
Williams
Educational Inquiry and Curriculum Studies
College of Education
Courses Taught
ICSE 201: History and Culture of Ethnic Groups
ICSE 322: Independent Study
ICSE 329E: Oral Tradition
ICSE 329F: Youth Organizing Activism
ICSE 329H: Inner City Development
ICSE 329V: Elite Theory and American Democracy
Research Interests
Interventions Aimed At Reducing High-Risk Health Behaviors in Inner City Communities; Qualitative Research Design and Methodology RESEARCH EXPERIENCE Principal Investigator (03/2006-Present) NEIU Grow Your Own Teachers Program The Grow Our Own Teacher Program (GYO) establishes an initiative to encourage and support paraprofessionals, parents, and other active community members in becoming certified as teachers. GYO seeks to stimulate the development of consortia made up of an institution that prepare teachers (NEIU), a targeted school district (CPS), and a community organization (ACORN Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now). Working together, these entities are to identify paraeducators and parents who have been leaders in schools with hard-to-staff positions and provide these individuals with the financial and other support they will need to complete teacher preparation programs. The new teachers are then to be placed in positions in the targeted schools. Principal Investigator (01/2007-08/2008) CeaseFire Evaluation Evaluated the effectiveness of the Chicago Project for Violence Prevention CeaseFire program, a State of Illinois funded violence reduction initiative. The purpose of the study was to find out what main "stakeholders" of this violence reduction program like individuals who reside in CeaseFire’s service areas, faith leaders, victims of violence, elected officials and the police had to say about the program. The evaluation used qualitative techniques, in particular, an ethnographic/focused interview process. Principal Investigator (04/2004) for a study with Whitney Young High School Social Work Department, Chicago, Illinois. I am conducting a focus group study that is examining adolescent males’ perceptions of manhood. The purpose of the study is to collect data that will be used to develop a rite of passage program for at-risk male students at Whitney Young. The study involved 8 focus groups that included over 50 freshmen through senior male students. I am currently analyzing the data. Research Associate (2000-present) Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy Research. University of Illinois-Chicago. I conducted my dissertation research, an ethnographic/focused interview study of a cultural intervention designed to reduce risky behaviors among inner-city African American youth at the Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy Research. Having completed the study, my goal now is to further the study by placing the findings in the context of education policy and health disparities among African American youth. Research Assistant (1996-1997) on the Aban Aya Youth Project at the University Illinois-Chicago, Prevention Research Center. Research Project: to develop and then evaluate a school-based program designed to promote abstinence from sex, teach students how to avoid drugs and alcohol, and to teach them how to resolve conflicts non-violently.
Education

Ph.D. Public Health Sciences University of Illinois-Chicago, Chicago, IL. 2004
Dissertation Research: Cultural intervention and perceptions of violence-related behaviors: A Role Strain and Adaptation Study of Adolescents

M.A. Inner City Studies EducationNortheastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL. 1995.

B.A. Applied Behavioral ScienceNational-Louis University, Chicago, IL. 1994.

Selected Publications

Williams, L. (2009). Culture & Perceptions of Violence-related Behaviors Among Adolescents: A Role Strain and Adaptation Model. Koln, Germany. Lambert Publishing.

Williams, L. & Moore, N. (In Publication). A Nation of Stones: Street Gangs, Black Power and Urban Terrorism. Chicago, Illinois. Lawrence Hills Books.

Williams, L. (In Print). Cultural interventions for reducing violence among young, African American males. In W. Johnson (Ed). Social Work with African-American Males. New York, New York: Oxford University Press.

Williams, L. (2009). Hip-hop as a site of public pedagogy. In B. Schultz, J. Sandlin and J. Burdick (Eds). In Handbook of Public Pedagogy: Education and Learning beyond Schooling. Routledge.

Williams, L. & Alexis-Bivens, S. (2008). The Father’s Toolkit: A Curriculum Guide for Reconnecting Incarcerated and Formerly Incarcerated Fathers With Their Children. Springfield, Illinois. Illinois Department of Human Services.

Williams, L. (under review). Evaluation of Chicago Violence Prevention Project CeaseFire.

Williams, Lance. (under review). Reducing Violence and Anti-Social Behavior of Young, Inner-City African American Males: A Rites of Passage Paradigm. International Journal of Africana Studies.

Williams, Lance. (under review). A Life-span perspective of antisocial behavior among young African American Males.

Background

TEACHING EXPERIENCE

Northeastern Illinois University 1999-Present

Sociology Courses: Sociology of Health and Illness, Sociology of Violence, Sociology of the Black Family, and Introduction to Sociology

Inner City Studies Education Courses: History of Culture and Ethnic Groups, The Inner City Community and Inner City Organization and Institution Building

Additional Information

CURRENT POSITION

2004-present: Assistant Director, Northeastern Illinois University’s Jacob H. Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies, Chicago, IL.

2006-present: Assistant Professor, Inner City Studies. Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago, IL.

SCHOOL-BASED INTERVENTIONS AND PROGRAMS

Walter Q. Gresham Elementary School (Chicago Public School). 1991-2001. Developed and coordinated an all males program for identified “at-risk” boys in grades 5 through 8. Conducted in biweekly sessions designed to carry out conflict resolution, anger management, individual counseling and mentoring, social and cultural enrichment, decision-making skills, social competence, resistance skills and normative beliefs. The goal of this program is to reduce insubordination, fighting, gang participation, drug use and other anti-social behaviors among participants.

Asa Phillip Randolph Magnet School (Chicago Public School). 1991-1998. As described above. Target Population-grades 1 through 8.

Hirsch Metropolitan High School (Chicago Public School). 1996-1998. As a member of the Hirsch Metropolitan High School Probation Team, I conducted a program for the most “at-risk” boys identified by the school Principal, Counselors and school Disciplinarian. These young men were identified to participate in this mentorship program due to problems with truancy, poor grades, gang-related activity and anti-social behavior. I started with a group of (15) boys in September 1996. By the time the school year ended, the group had mushroomed to (40) forty boys. By 1998, the group consisted of over 100 boys.

Tanner Elementary School (Chicago Public School). April 20th. Planned, implemented and conducted a rites of passage program for over (100) one hundred 4th, 5th, and 6th grade boys. The goal of the rites of passage was to introduce the participants to traditional African value systems and character development.

Jensen/Miller Scholastic Academy (Chicago Public School) 1991 through 1993. Developed and coordinate an all males program for identified “at-risk” boys in grades 3 through 8. Conducted in biweekly sessions designed to carry out conflict resolution, anger management, individual counseling and mentoring, social and cultural enrichment, decision-making skills, social competence, resistance skills and normative beliefs. The goal of this program is to reduce insubordination, fighting, gang participation, drug use and other anti-social behaviors among participants.

Frazier Elementary School (Chicago Public Schools) 1991 through 1992. As described above.

West Pullman School (Chicago Public Schools) Jan. 6th through Feb. 28th, 1992. Planned, implemented and coordinated the Culture Alive Program. This program consisted of over 25 visual and performing artists, a host of cultural vendors and educators who converged on the school during this period to bring each child and classroom from kindergarten to 8th grade the rich and diverse cultures of Africa. The program culminated with a school wide taste of Africa and two assemblies.

GRANTS

Principal Writer (January 2007) Black United Fund of Illinois’ (BUFI) Safety Net Works Grant.

Safety Net Works is an initiative comprised of State of Illinois agencies and community-based organizations formed to help alleviate violence and killing in communities in Illinois. BUFI is headquartered in the South Shore community of Chicago, one of the 17 Safety Net Work target communities. As the Principal Writer of the grant I developed the Coalition of Organizational, Neighborhood and Network Empowerment through Culture, Talent and Spirituality (CONNECTS @ South Shore), a youth violence prevention initiative designed to reduce violence among youth ages 12 to 24 in South Shore. The purpose of CONNECTS is to foster community partnerships through strong relations among the youths, families, schools, faith-based organizations, businesses, parks, elected officials and community-based institutions and the Chicago Police Department in South Shore. BUFI was awarded $320,000 grant to implement CONNECTS @ South Shore.

Principal Writer and Program Evaluator (March 2006) The Literacy, Employment and Self-Sufficiency Project (LES) LES seeks to provide literacy, employment and self-sufficiency programs to one hundred (100) “hard to reach” Chicago public housing residents who are significantly in need of workplace literacy and self awareness development. Funding- 150,000.

Co-Writer (March 2006) Grow Your Own Teachers Program. The Grow Our Own Teacher  program (GYO) establishes an initiative to encourage and support paraprofessionals, parents, and other active community members in becoming certified as teachers. GYO seeks to stimulate the development of consortia made up of an institution that prepare teachers (NEIU), a targeted school district (CPS), and a community organization (ACORN Association  of Community Organizations for Reform Now). Working together, these entities are to identify paraeducators and parents who have been leaders in schools with hard-to-staff positions and provide these individuals with the financial and other support they will need to complete teacher preparation programs. The new teachers are then to be placed in positions in the targeted schools. Funding-$40,000 Planning Grant.

TEACHING EXPERIENCE CONTINUED

University of Illinois-Chicago 2004-2006
Community Health Sciences Division Course- Behavioral Sciences in Public Health (Graduate Program)

National-Louis University 1999-2004
Applied Behavioral Sciences Division Course- Methods of Inquiry in the Behavioral Sciences

CONSULTANT / ADVISORY

Board Member, The Diversifying Higher Education Faculty in Illinois Program (DFI). DFI was established by the Illinois General Assembly and signed as Public Act 093-0862 on August 4, 2004. The purpose of DFI is to increase the number of underrepresented faculty and staff in Illinois institutions of higher education and higher education governing boards. 2004-Present

Executive Committee Member, Governor’s Statewide Community Safety & Reentry Working Group. The primary purpose of the committee is to provide recommendations for review by January 2006 for the design of a new statewide reentry system. 2004-present

Founder/Board Chair, The Know Thyself Program INC. Chicago, IL. The Know Thyself program, a not-for-profit community-based organization, does school-based cultural and social enrichment for inner-city youth who live in Chicago’s marginalized communities. 1989-present

Member of the Hirsch Metropolitan High School, Vernon Johns Community Academy and Fulton Elementary School Probation Management Team. In affiliation with the I Had A  Dream, Inc. and National School Services, I monitored school community safety and make recommendations for improvement to the Probation Manager. 1997 to 2000.

Chief Consultant to Chicago Public Schools-School Community Safety & Security Program at Carter Elementary School. Implemented the Kijiji Kwa Amani (village of Peace) Program designed to foster a safe environment for Carter School students. The program included the establishment and training of the Kijiji Kwa Amani Parent Patrol and conflict resolution training for a student leadership group. March 17th 16th, 1995.

Consultant services to Chicago Public Schools Academic and Vocational Education Department. Worked as an advisor to Nansen School on effective Parenting in violent and drug plagued environments. Chicago, IL. April 12th

Consultant services to Hirsch Metropolitan High School Local School Council. Worked as an advisor to the Hirsch School Local School Council on effective approaches to dealing with Violence and Drug Prevention Strategies. May 19th 1994.

Chief Consultant and advisor to Carter School/CANAL Project Curriculum Development Committee on the Infusion of African Centered Topics Into The Chicago Public Schools system wide Objectives and Standards At The Intermediate Level (4-5). This committee produced five lessons in each intermediate subject area (Language Arts, Mathematics, Science and Social Studies). Carter School. Chicago, IL. May 11th through July 15th, 1993.

PRESENTATIONS

Invited University Lectures

“Continuing the Journey: High School and Beyond.” Presentation for the African American Male Resource Center. Chicago State University. Chicago, Illinois. April 24 2009.

“The Corporate Take Over of Hip Hop.” Delta College. University Center, MI. February 2009.

“The Rap Music Industry: Sex, Lies and Videotape.” St. Xavier University. Chicago Illinois. February 2009.

“Hip Hop Generation, Culture, and Leadership.” College of Lake County. Waukegan Illinois. June 2008.

“The Corporate Take Over of Hip Hop.” St. Louis Community College. St. Louis, Missouri. February 2008.

“The Rap Music Industry as Cultural Weaponry for White Supremacy.” Lecture for the Department of Pan-African Studies, the Institute of African American Affairs and the Center of Pan-African Culture. Kent State University. Kent, Ohio. November 3, 2005

“On Lock Down: Disproportionality among African American boys in special education programs and criminal justice systems.” Presentation Social Work and Social Welfare Responses to African American Males: A Research, Public Policy and Intervention Practice Symposium. University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration. Chicago, IL. April 22, 2005

“The Rap Music Industry as Cultural Weaponry for White Supremacy.” Presentation. Northeastern Illinois University. Chicago, IL. February 15, 2005

“The Mass Media: Keepin’ It Unreal.” Presenter for the Olive-Harvey Middle College and The Triumphant Charter School. Olive-Harvey College. Chicago, IL. November 14, 2003.

“The Mass Media: Keepin’ It Unreal.” Presenter for the Feminine Dynamics Rites of Passage Conference. DePaul University. Chicago, Il. October 4, 2003.

“Corporatization of Hip Hop: Voices and Images of the Marginalized.” Guest Lecturer for a course on the mass media and popular culture. Kennedy-King College. Chicago, IL. April 29th, 2003.

“Corporatization of Hip Hop: Voices and Images of the Marginalized.” Presenter/Panelist at the Black Law Students Association Black History Month panel discussion. Northwestern University Law School. Chicago, Il. February 13, 2003.

“The All Mighty Black P Stone Nation: Black Power, Politics and Gang Bangin.” Guest Lecturer for course on Gangs and the Media. University of Illinois-Chicago. Chicago, IL. October 17, 2001.

“Multiculturalism Vs. Ethnocentrism.” Guest Lecturer for course on Instructional Strategies for Diverse Populations. Loyola University. Chicago, IL. April 23, 1998.

“African Origins of Civilization.” Guest Presenter for the African American Students Association. Northwestern University. Evanston, IL. March 15th, 1992.

Invited Papers

“Reducing Violence and Anti-Social Behavior of Young, Inner-City African American Males:A Rites of Passage Paradigm.” At the 24th Annual International Conference of the National Council for Black Studies. Atlanta, GA., March 17th, 2000.

Conferences

"The Corporatization of Hip Hop: Implications for Identity, Attitudes, and Behavior Among Youth in the African Diaspora”. 32nd Annual Third World Conference. Chicago, Illinois. March 16, 2006

“Hip Hop and the role of the faith community.” The Christian Methodist Episcopal One Church One School National Conference. Oak Lawn, Illinois. October 17, 2003

“America’s consumerist culture and the development of African American Youth: Assessment and Implications.” The 23rd Annual Black Studies Conference. Chicago, IL. April 14th, 2000.

“Violent Death With in the Family.” A National Series of Conferences on Black-On-Black Crime: Prevention and Cures Year 2000. The Institute for Social Justice. Chicago, IL. April 17th, 2000.

“The Role of the Media, the Internet/Computers and Scams and Youth Violence.” A National Series of Conferences on Black-On-Black Crime: Prevention and Cures Year 2000. The Institute for Social Justice. Chicago, IL. April 18th, 2000.

Agencies

“Sociology of Poverty.” Action for Children Agency. In-serviced 100 Action for Children Agency staff on the Sociology of Poverty. Chicago, IL. June 21-23, 2005.

“Gangsta Rap and Images of Blacks in the Media.” Staff and Clients. Bobby Wright Mental Health Center. Chicago, IL. Oct 29th, 1998.

“Images of African American Males in the Media.” Staff and Clients. Community Supportive Living Systems, Inc. Chicago, IL. Feb 24th, 1996.

“Fostering African American Males.” Statewide Foster Parent Conference. State of Illinois Department of Children and Family Services. Chicago, IL. June 6th, 1992.

School Workshops/In-services and Training

“Lessons Learned from Hip Hop.” 7th Community School Intra-City Student Council. Gary, Indiana. February 2009.

“Coalition Building for Youth Violence Prevention.” Safety Net Works Training-Illinois Department of Human Services. Chicago Illinois. March 2008.

“The Hip Hop Generation Workshop (Teacher Training).” Chicago Public Schools-Richards Career Academy. Chicago Illinois. March 2008.

“The Hip Hop Generation Workshop (Student Workshop).” Chicago Public Schools-Richards Career Academy. Chicago Illinois. April 2008.

“What Teachers Need to Know About Classroom Management for Hard-To-Reach Youth.” Chicago Public Schools Chicago New Teacher Center. Chicago, Illinois. April 2008.

“The Hip Hop Generation Workshop (Teacher Training).” Chicago Public Schools-Corliss Career Academy. Chicago Illinois. March 2008.

“The National Stop the Violence Campaign (Panelist).” Chicago Public Schools. Chicago, Illinois. April 2008.

“The Rap Music Industry and The Battle for the Minds, Bodies, and Spirits of Black Youth.” Carter Temple. Tyler, Texas. April 2008.

Center and Periphery: Hip Hop As An Expression of American Social Organization. Associated Colleges of the Midwest-Urban Studies Program. Chicago, Illinois. May 2008.

“The Hip Hop Generation Workshop (Student Workshop).” Chicago Public Schools-Hirsch Metropolitan Career Academy. Chicago Illinois. May 12 through 15 2008.

Annual Youth Leadership Conference. Gary Indiana

“The Hip Hop Generation Workshop (Student Workshop).” Chicago Public Schools-Corliss Career Academy. Chicago Illinois. May 16 2008.

“The Hip Hop Generation Workshop (Student Workshop).” Chicago Public Schools-Moses-Vines High School. Chicago Illinois. May 27 2008.

“The Hip Hop Generation Workshop (Student Workshop).” Chicago Public Schools-Wells High School. Chicago Illinois. May 29 2008.

“The Hip Hop Generation Workshop (Student Workshop).” Chicago Public Schools-Clemente High School. Chicago Illinois. May 30 2008.

“The Rap Music Industry and The Battle for the Minds, Bodies, and Spirits of Black Youth.” Christian Methodist Church. Tulsa, Oklahoma. June 2008.

“The Corporatization of Hip Hop and Its Impact on School Communities.” University of St. Thomas Summer Wellness Institute-A Framework for Providing A Safe and Healthy Learning Environment. Racine, Wisconsin. June 17 2008.

“Using Hip Hop to Improve the Behavior of Hard to Reach Youth.” University of St. Thomas Summer Wellness Institute-A Framework for Providing A Safe and Healthy Learning Environment. Racine, Wisconsin. June 17 2008.

“The Corporatization of Hip Hop and Its Impact on School Communities.” University of St. Thomas Summer Wellness Institute-A Framework for Providing A Safe and Healthy Learning Environment. Madison, Wisconsin. June 24 2008.

“Using Hip Hop to Improve the Behavior of Hard to Reach Youth.” University of St. Thomas Summer Wellness Institute-A Framework for Providing A Safe and Healthy Learning Environment. Madison, Wisconsin. June 24 2008.

“Lessons Learned from Hip-Hop: Using the Voice of Youth as a Transformative Tool to Create Positive, Pro-Social Behavior.” Milwaukee Public Schools. Milwaukee, Wisconsin. November 2008.

“The Hip Hop Generation Workshop.” Conducted workshop with 500 males between the ages of 12 to 18 on the impact of the rap music industry on the images, attitudes and beliefs of young, urban males. The Chicago Council on Urban Affairs-Roosevelt University. Chicago, IL. May 18th, 2006

“Hip Hop as a tool for increasing literacy among inner-city youth.” Workshop training for students. Chicago Vocational High School. Chicago, IL. February 16, 2006

“Hip Hop and the faith community.” Conducted workshops on the role that the faith community can play in influencing positive images and voices in the rap music industry. The One Church One School National Conference. Chicago, IL. October 21, 2005

“Hip Hop as a tool for increasing literacy among inner-city youth.” Parent workshop training for parents at South Shore High School. South Shore High School. Chicago, IL. October 7, 2005

“Implications of Rap Music on the Behavior of Adolescents.” No Child Left Behind Committee. Kenwood High School. Chicago, IL. February 8, 2005

“Survey of Health Disparities in Chicago’s Communities of Color: Implications for Black Social Workers.” Training for the National Association of Black Social Workers. Chicago Chapter. Chicago, IL. February 7, 2005

“Corporatization of Hip Hop: Voices and Images of the Marginalized.” In-serviced 400 Chicago Public School Social Workers on the influences of rap music on the behavior of inner-city youth and implications for the social worker. Chicago Public Schools Social Work Department Chicago, Il. June 23, 2003.

“Conflict Resolution.” Parent Workshop Series. Beethoven School. Chicago, IL. July 5th, 6th, 9th, 16th, 23rd, 1998.

“School Rules, Home Rules and Gang Rules.” Parent Workshop Series. Fulton School. Chicago, IL. July 14th & 24th, 1998.

“Rites of Passage: Positive Adolescent Choices Training.” Student Workshop Series. Ryder School. Chicago, IL. March 12th through April 30th, 1997.

“Teaching Inner City Youth.” Teacher In-service series. St. Sabina School. Chicago, IL. March 13th, April 24th, 1996.

“Inner-City Youth Culture.” Student and Parent Workshop. Spaulding High School. Chicago, IL. April 25th, 1996.

“Societal Violence and its Effect on Inner City Youth.” Englewood High School. Chicago, IL. May 7th, 1996.

“Safe and Drug Free Schools.” Student (5) Series Workshop. Vernon Johns Community Academy. Chicago, IL. March through May 1996.

“Conflict Management Training.” Student Workshop Series. Vernon Johns Community Academy. Chicago, IL. March 13th, 20th, & 27th, 1996.

“Training Students to be Conflict Managers.” Student Workshop Series. Vernon Johns Community Academy. Chicago, IL. Feb. 26th, 27th, 28th, & 29th, 1996.

“Training Students and Staff to be Conflict Managers.” Student and Staff Workshop Series. Vernon Johns Community Academy. Chicago, IL. Feb. 20th, 21rst, 22nd, 23rd, 26th, 28th, & 29th, 1996.

“Teaching Your Child to Handle Conflict.” Parent Workshop. Vernon Johns Community Academy. Chicago, IL. June 21st, 1995.

“Infusing Conflict Resolution Into School Curriculum.” Teacher In-service. Vernon Johns Community Academy. Chicago, IL. May 15th, 1995.

“Conflict Resolution Training.” Student Workshop. Vernon Johns Community Academy. Chicago, IL. May 13th, 1995.

“Behavior Modification of Black Boys.” Teacher In-service. Gompers Elementary School. Chicago, IL. July 7th, 1995.

“African Origins of Civilization.” Teacher In-Service. Harlan Academy. Chicago, IL. Feb. 24th, 1994.

“Drug Free Schools.” Student Workshop. Lindbloom Technical High School. Chicago, IL. May 26th, 1994.

“Self Esteem, Cultural Awareness, and Self Discipline.” Student Workshop Retreat. Terrell School. Chicago, IL. Summer 1993.

“A Comprehensive Approach to School Based Violence and Drug Prevention Programs.” A (7) series workshop for school administrators. Chicago Public Schools Region Six. Chicago, IL. June 6th through July 2nd, 1992.

“Assisting pupils with home work and study skills.” Parent Workshop. Bonn Temps School. Chicago IL. June 10th, 1992.

“Home and School Discipline in Partnership.” Parent Workshop. Chicago Public Schools Drug Prevention Program. Chicago, IL. June 6th, 1992.

“Rites of Passage: A Model for Socialization.” Teacher, Parent and Student Workshop. James Weldon Johnson Elementary School. Chicago, IL. Jan. 23rd, 1992.

“Afrocentric Curriculum.” Teacher In-service. West Pullman Elementary School. Chicago, IL. Feb. 4th, 1992.

“Teaching the Black Male Student.” Teacher In-service. Simon Guggenheim Elementary School. Chicago, IL. Feb. 5th, 1992.

“An Afrocentric Approach to Raising Black Boys.” Parent Workshop. Beethoven School. Chicago IL. Feb. 5th, 1992.

“Raising The Inner-City Child.” Parent Workshop. Englewood High School. Chicago, IL. Feb. 8th, 1992.

“The African Centered Curriculum.” Parent Workshop. Anthony Overton Elementary School. Chicago, IL. Apr. 9th, 1992.

“African Contributions to Civilization: Curriculum Infusion.” A Multimedia Presentation for Teachers. Carver Area High School. Chicago, IL. May, 12th, 1992.

“Improving Your Child’s Self-Image.” Parent Workshop. Robert Fulton School. Chicago, IL. May 13th, 1992.

“Youth Gang Awareness.” System-wide teacher in-service. Chicago Public Schools Department of Drug Education. Ramada Inn. Chicago, IL. May 16th, 1992.

“Is Your Child Gang Banging?” Parent Workshop. Robert Fulton School. Chicago, IL. May 29th, 1992.

“Gangs, Violence, and Drugs in Chicago Public Schools.” School Community Retreat at the Hickory Hill Center. Tilden High School. Lisle, IL. May 30th, 1992.

 

Office Hours
By Appointment
Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies