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Course Offerings

The Department of Communication, Media, and Theatre offers an undergraduate Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree and a graduate Master of Arts (M.A.) degree via a wide variety of courses.

2016-2020 Projected CMT Course Rotation

If you are interested in seeing what courses are likely coming up, this document will help you to plan your degree program. Please note that this is our course rotation plan. It is not a guarantee that these courses will be offered in this sequence. Course offerings are dependent upon a number of factors including student enrollment and faculty availability. Students should regularly check with their faculty advisor when scheduling courses.

Projected CMT Course Rotation (2016-2020).pdf [Revised Dec. 15, 2015]

FALL 2018 COURSE OFFERINGS:

  • Communication Courses:

    • CMTC 100 Introduction to Communication
    • CMTC 101 Public Speaking
    • CMTC 202 Voice and Diction
    • CMTC 213 Interpersonal Communication
    • CMTC 214 Business and Professional Communication
    • CMTC 301 Nonverbal Communication
    • CMTC 305 Writing in Communication, Media, and Theatre (WIP)
    • CMTC 306 Special Topics in Communiation (Argumentation and Debate)
    • CMTC 313 Communication, Gender, and Identity
    • CMTC 315 Leadership Communication
    • CMTC 316 Family Communication
    • CMTC 383 Professional Internship
  • Media Courses:
    • CMTM 105 Introduction to Journalism
    • CMTM 109A FYE: Chicago One Pixel at a Time
    • CMTM 160 Introduction to Cinema
    • CMTM 250 Intro to Audio Production
    • CMTM 260 Intro to Video Production
    • CMTM 265 Mass Media and Society
    • CMTM 361 Digital Video Editing
    • CMTM 364 Writing for Media (Solutions Journalism)
    • CMTM 365 Contemporary Issues in Mass Media
    • CMTM 367 News Writing
    • CMTM 370 Public Relations
    • CMTM 371 American Cinema (Origins - 1950)
    • CMTM 376 Television History
    • CMTM 377 Gender and Media
    • CMTM 379 Media Law & Ethics
    • CMTM 383 Professional Internship
    • CMTM 390 NEIU Cinémathèque
  • Theatre Courses:
    • CMTT 130 Introduction to Theatre
    • CMTT 221 Acting
    • CMTT 240 Stagecraft
    • CMTT 331 History of Theatre 1
    • CMTT 333 Contemporary Theatre
    • CMTT 334 Special Topics in Theatre (Comedy in Context)
    • CMTT 339 Advanced Theatre Practicum
    • CMTT 342 Costume Design
    • CMTT 345 Directing
    • CMTT 347 Playwriting
    • CMTT 351 Children’s Theatre Workshop - Middle School
    • CMTT 383 Professional Internship
    • CMTT 393 Drama for Teaching and Learning
  • Graduate Courses:
    • CMTC 401 Introduction to Gradute Study
    • CMTE 490 Instructional Communication
    • CMTM 466 Media and Cultural Studies

SPRING 2019 COURSE OFFERINGS:

  • Communication Courses:

    • CMTC 100 Introduction to Communication
    • CMTC 101 Public Speaking
    • CMTC 202 Voice and Diction
    • CMTC 213 Interpersonal Communication
    • CMTC 215 Small Group Communication
    • CMTC 300 Mediated Communication
    • CMTC 301 Nonverbal Communication
    • CMTC 305 Writing in Communication, Media, and Theatre (WIP)
    • CMTC 310 Persuasion
    • CMTC 313 Communication, Gender, and Identity
    • CMTC 314 Organizational Communication
    • CMTC 315 Leadership Communication
    • CMTC 316 Family Commmunication
    • CMTC 319 Leadership Communication
    • CMTC 383 Professional Internship
  • Media Courses:
    • CMTM 105 Introduction to Journalism
    • CMTM 160 Introduction to Cinema
    • CMTM 205 Fundamentals of Media Writing
    • CMTM 260 Introduction to Video Production
    • CMTM 265 Mass Media and Society
    • CMTM 360 Advanced Video Production
    • CMTM 363 Documentary Film
    • CMTM 364A Writing for Media: Writing the Sitcom
    • CMTM 366 Multimedia Storytelling
    • CMTM 372 American Cinema (1950 - Present)
    • CMTM 374 Special Topics in Film (Teen Movies)
    • CMTM 378 New Media Technologies
    • CMTM 383 Professional Internship
    • CMTM 390 NEIU Cinémathèque
  • Theatre Courses:
    • CMTT 130 Introduction to Theatre
    • CMTT 203 Voice for the Stage 
    • CMTT 221 Acting I
    • CMTT 249 Makeup
    • CMTT 321 Acting 2
    • CMTT 332 History of Theatre 2
    • CMTT 334 Special Topics in Theatre (Latinx Drama)
    • CMTT 338 Melodrama
    • CMTT 339 Advanced Theatre Practicum
    • CMTT 340 Set Design
    • CMTT 345 Directing
    • CMTT 346 American Musical Theatre
    • CMTT 350 Children’s Theatre Workshop - Elementary School
    • CMTT 359 Experimental Theatre
    • CMTT 383 Professional Internship 
  • Graduate Courses:
    • CMTC 402 Seminar in Research Methods
    • CMTC 404 Communication Theory

Communication Course Descriptions

CMTC 100: Introduction to Communication

The study of human communication with emphasis on how we communicate, the factors that influence the success of our communication interactions, and the areas in which communication takes place.

CMTC 101: Public Speaking

The development of skills common to all forms of oral communication with emphasis on public speaking. Students will study organization, delivery, sources of materials, and language use.

CMTC 202: Voice and Diction

Emphasis on improving voice quality, volume, projection, rate, articulation, and pronunciation.

CMTC 210: Advanced Public Speaking

Concentrated study of public speaking and research for public speech, with attention to speech criticism and providing experience in various types of public speaking. Students will videotape selected talks for critique.

CMTC 213: Interpersonal Communication

This course studies how humans relate through the use of verbal and nonverbal symbols. Through participation and involvement, students explore how communication creates, maintains, and deteriorates relationships. Students also examine messages, meanings, feedback, nonverbal elements, listening, barriers, and breakdowns as they affect relationships.

CMTC 214: Business and Professional Communication

This course focuses on the development of oral and written communication skills that are essential for professional life, including topics such as problem-solving, listening, interviewing, and presentational skills.

CMTC 215: Small Group Communication

This course provides an in-depth study of small gropu communication processes. Students explore topics such as decision-makinga and problem solving, leadership, conflict, and diversity issues. Students are required to participate in a group project. 

CMTC 300: Mediated Communication

This is an investigation of the effects media and technologies have on social interaction and communcation behaviors such as speaking, listening, understanding, and interpreting.

CMTC 301: Nonverbal Communication

This course explores the nature of non-verbal messages such as body language, facial expression, and artifacts in various communication contexts.

CMTC 305: Writing in Communication, Media, and Theatre (WIP)

This course is a writing intensive experience designed to introduce students to the functions and applications of various writing practices and theories in communication, media, and theatre. Students will gain an understanding of the foundations of these disciplines; recognize the broad categories of theoretical perspectives, such as humanistic, social scientific, and critical; and evaluate the contributions of various theories in interpersonal, rhetorical, organizational, media, dramatic, and intercultural contexts. This course includes formal (graded) and informal writing exercises of varying length and complexity, including but not limited to: free-writing, reading responses, and article critiques, as well as more advanced analysis and application papers. Prereq.: ENG 101 minimum grade of C

CMTC 306: Special Topics in Communication (Rotating Topics)

This special topics course provides undergraduate students with the opportunity to study in depth a particular topic of communication. Topics will include, but are not limited to, the role and importance of communication in religion and science, politics, negotiation, intimacy and desire, and social difference. 

CMTC 308: Independent Study in Communication

Individual investigation into a topic of the student’s choice. This course requires approval of the instructor, Department Chair, and the Dean.

CMTC 310: Persuasion

This course examines contemporary theories and practices of persuasion through analysis and evaluation of persuasive messages in society from the used car lot to the presidential campaign.

CMTC 313: Communication, Gender, and Identity

This course investigates some of the effects that gender and other identities have on communication behaviors, such as naming behavior, language acquisition, professional orientation, conflict management, self-image, dress, and social roles.

CMTC 314: Organizational Communication

This course examines organizational communication processes such as organizational culture, diversity, workplace participation, and democracy. Students will assess (in)effective communication practices in organizations. 

CMTC 315: Leadership Communication

This course examines the theory and practice of the social-emotional and task-related aspects of leadership proceses. Students will explore standard works in classical leadership theory and contemporary frameworks related to motivation, emotional intelligence, and toxic leadership dynamics. 

CMTC 316: Family Communication

This course studies the family system with a focus on the role communication plays in maintaining it. Students explore the functions of family roles, rules and power, and ways to increase or decrease communication effectiveness in this system.

CMTC 317: Intercultural Communication

This course explores issues in intercultural communication. Students will examine their own as well other people's cultures. Major topics include race and ethnicity, immigration, social class, intercultural conflict, and social justice and how these reflect and/or affect verbal and nonverbal communiation processes.  

CMTC 319: Conflict Communication

This course examines the communication processes in interpersonal, organizational, and intercultural conflict, with attention to the theories, research, and practice related to conflict management.

CMTC 322: Rhetorical Theory and Criticism

Rhetorical theories from the modern era with attention to principal figures and critical methods. Prereq.: Junior standing or consent of instructor

CMTC 324: Rhetoric of Protest and Reform

Study of the speakers who through public communication had an impact on the course of American history from the colonial period to the present, such as Jonathan Edwards, Patrick Henry, Wendell Phillips, Robert Ingersoll, Angelina Grimke, William Lloyd Harrison, Carry Nation, Eugene V. Debs, Harry Truman, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Prereq.: Junior standing or consent of instructor

CMTC 328: Rhetoric - Selected Studies

In-depth study of a particular rhetorical figure, tradition, or period. Emphasis placed on the impact of rhetorical communication in a specific social, cultural, or historical context. Prereq.: Junior standing or consent of instructor

CMTC 329: Health Communication

This course is designed to provide an introduction to communication processes in various health care contexts. The course will integrate interpersonal, small group, organizational, and mass communication theory and research into a survey of areas such as communication between patients and caregivers, the role of culture in health practices, images of health in the mass media, and new directions in health communication technologies.

CMTC 330: Communication Research Methods

An introduction to the principles and methods of social scientific research as they relate to the antecedents, processes, and outcomes of communication behaviors. This course is intended to cultivate skills necessary for interpreting and critically evaluating research results and for designing research projects. Topics include forming research questions and hypotheses, reviewing and critiquing literature, applying quantitative and qualitative research techniques, coding and analyzing observations, and writing research reports. 

CMTC 383: Professional Internship 1

Professional activities in a selected field of communication, media, or theatre performed and supervised at public or private facilities, corporate communication sites, businesses, agencies, theaters, etc. Requires application process.

CMTC 384: Professional Internship 2

Professional activities in a selected field of communication, media, or theatre performed and supervised at public or private facilities, corporate communication sites, businesses, agencies, theaters, etc. Requires application process.

CMTC 385: Professional Internship 3

Professional activities in a selected field of communication, media, or theatre performed and supervised at public or private facilities, corporate communication sites, businesses, agencies, theaters, etc. Requires application process.

CMTC 386: Professional Experience Seminar

This course will provide students with an opportunity to work in a professional communication, media, or theatre position while examining the experience with a faculty member and their peers. For many students, a professional placement is a new, unfamiliar experience with a set of demands that are distinct from the academic world. This course will allow students to earn credit for an internship in their desired field, while enhancing their professionalism through discussion and reflection. Consent of the instructor is required.

CMTC 400: Special Topics in Communication (Rotating Topics)

This special topics course provides graduate students with the opportunity to study in depth a particular area (e.g., intercultural, group, gender, family, organizational, interpersonal), topic (e.g., identity and difference, intimacy and desire, corporate consulting, political rhetoric), or method (e.g., rhetorical criticism, auto/ethnography, content analysis) of communication. The focus will be on critically examining foundational and contemporary works that advance the theory, research, and practice about this area, topic, or method. Topics include Communication and Difference among others.

CMTC 401: Introduction to Graduate Study

Problems, methods, and resources involved in graduate study and research in all areas of communication, media, and theatre.

CMTC 402: Seminar in Research Methods

An introduction to the principles and methods of Communication, Media, and Theatre research. This course is intended to cultivate skills necessary for interpreting and critically evaluating research results and for designing research, critiquing literature, applying quantitative and qualitative research techniques, coding and analyzing observations, and writing research reports.

CMTC 404: Communication Theory

An analysis of communication theories, including the nature of theories, message design, and reception. Course covers a broad range of theories in the communication discipline, including both humanistic and social-scientific approaches. Nonetheless, particular theories analyzed each semester will vary depending on the instructor.

CMTC 414: Seminar in Organizational Communication

This course will provide an advanced look at the major elements of organizational theory that apply to organizational communication. This field, in a modern sense, began in the 1950s and since then has grown to be one of the biggest forces in communication today. We will examine the theories that direct the reality of organizations and how much of that reality is managed for the purposes of controlling individuals, whether overtly or symbolically.

CMTC 416: Seminar in Interpersonal Communication

This is a seminar exploring the basic themes, concepts, and debates in research on personal relationships. Students will learn to critically analyze theory and research about relationships. The course requires a major paper on one particular facet of communication in personal relationships.

CMTC 434: Independent Study in Communication

Individual investigation into selected topics in the theory and practice of communication. This course requires approval of the instructor, Department Chair, and the appropriate College Dean(s).

CMTC 5901, 5209, 5903: Thesis Seminar

Guidance of student work toward the completion of a thesis to fulfill the requirements of the Master of Arts degree in Communication, Media, and Theatre. This course requires approval of the instructor, Department Chair, and the appropriate College Dean(s).

Media Course Descriptions

CMTM 105: Introduction to Journalism

This survey course introduces students to the field of journalism, its basic concepts, processes and practices. It is intended as a guide to the workings of the journalism industry, including its various branches, the basis of news judgment, and the nature of journalism in the era of new media. Its hands-on approach is designed to provide a theoretical as well as “real world” understanding of the news and application of principles related to the production and dissemination of the news.

CMTM 109A: First Year Experience: Chicago on Video: One Pixel at a Time

In this course, the five foundations of the First-Year Experience (Future Planning, Integral Preparation, Research, Self-discovery and Transitions) are interwoven with the field-specific concepts and terminology of video production. Students in this dynamic, hands-on class will turn the lens on other students engaged in hands-on learning...producing children’s theatre, testing water samples, conducting fieldwork, examining issues of social justice…and get a taste of both documentary production and advanced undergraduate coursework at NEIU. Students will also get to explore uses of video at the community level - from high school students covering sports events, to local immigrants keeping their cultural ties alive.

CMTM 160: Introduction to Cinema

This course introduces students to the basic elements of cinema (editing, cinematography, sound, etc.) and explores how these elements contribute to our understanding of the themes and meanings of a particular film. After gaining a foundational understanding of these formal elements, students assess how topics such as genre, narrative, authorship, and ideology help to shape cinema. 

CMTM 165: Broadcasting and New Media

Introduction to the business and creative processes, structure, and function of American television and radio, emphasizing the production, distribution, and reception of news and information programming.

CMTM 205: Fundamentals of Media Writing

This course helps students solidify grammar and writing skills so they can ener the competitive field of media. It focuses on punctuation and spelling issues and introduces the “Bible” of the print media, The Associated Press Stylebook. Fundamentals of Media Writing picks up where the Introduction to Journalism, CMTM 105 leaves off, by moving students from talking about analyzing journalistic writing, to learning the basic tools to begin practicing the profession. The course serves as a skill-building foundation and prerequisite for the News Writing class, CMTM 367.

CMTM 208: Media Laboratory

Participation in various phases of production and management for either on-campus or off-campus radio, television, or film activities. Communication, Media, and Theatre majors may repeat this course once for laboratory credit towards graduation requirements. Requires consent of instructor.

CMTM 250: Introduction to Audio Production

This course introduces students to the process of audio production. The course also explores sound as an industry and an art form, as well as a tool of self-expression and of storytelling. Through a series of production exercises, working individually and in groups, the student becomes familiar with the process of audio production from concept to field recordings, to scripting and editing, to producing and mixing, and then to sharing the finished work with others.

CMTM 260: Introduction to Video Production

This class will introduce students to the principles and practices of digital video production, with an emphasis on single-camera field production and digital, non-linear editing. Aesthetics and conventions of television programs, independent/art videos, and documentaries will also be examined.

CMTM 265: Mass Media and Society

Development and problems of the media; the history, regulation, and social and economic implications of the media; American media systems and their relation to the media’s cultural content and function.

CMTM 310: Independent Study in Media

Individual investigation into a topic of the student’s choice.

CMTM 311: Fieldwork in Video Production

Academic credit (1-6cr.) for guided video production fieldwork. Reserved for students who have been invited to participate in documentary, narrative, experimental, commercial, or other relevant and typically off-campus field production opportunities. Student enrolls with media faculty who directs project and oversees student performance. Students will utilize research skills, apply principles learned in classroom, contribute meaningfully to a long-strand production, earn credit in a broadcast or higher-profile production, and explore career options. May be taken more than once, for a maximum of six credit hours.Prereq.: CMTM 260 and consent of instructor

CMTM 360: Advanced Video Production

This hands-on class will expand students’ understanding and application of the tools of video production. Student projects will primarily be individually produced, single-camera video programs. We will screen many examples of video works of a variety of genres and with an eye for the impact of the mode of transmission on the product. We will pay critical attention to audio for video, focus on the development of one’s own “voice,” and emphasize constructive criticism and revision. Prereq.: CMTM 260

CMTM 361: Digital Video Editing

This hands-on class introduces students to the principles and practices of digital, non-linear video editing, including the aesthetics and conventions of film and video cutting, history and theories of editing, and technical aspects of editing. Students will use sample footage to edit, present, and critique several projects, and they will edit a final piece using footage of their own choosing. Prereq.: CMTM 260 or consent of instructor

CMTM 362: Video Production Workshop

In this intensive hands-on class, students will produce short non-fiction video modules, linked to a specific theme each term. Students will work in small production teams and will write, direct, shoot, and edit their segments, rotating responsibilities. Students will screen, critique, and revise modules, create finished shows, and organize and promote screenings. Prereq.: CMTM 260

CMTM 363: Documentary Film

Historical survey of the international non-fiction film, including creative films, anthropological films, and television journalistic documentaries. Prereq.: CMTM 160 recommended

CMTM 364: Writing for Media (Rotating Topics)

This revolving topics course provides exposure to a variety of writing topics and writing formats that will give students studying media the opportunity to develop in-depth written works in a workshop environment, with an emphasis on constructive criticism and revision. Consult the Schedule of Classes for specific topics. Recent examples include "Solutions Journalism.")

CMTM 364A: Writing for Media: Writing the Sitcom

This is a course devoted to writing the television half-hour situation comedy - a highly conventionalized television form. Students will discuss theories of comedy, analyze the structure of the sitcom, and learn industry standards for formatting and developing a script from initial idea to final script. Students will work in an approximation of a television "writers' room" in which feedback and critique are part of the creative process. 

CMTM 365: Contemporary Issues in Mass Media

Advanced study of the socio-psychological impact of the media upon contemporary society. Prereq.: CMTM 265

CMTM 366: Multimedia Storytelling

This course will involve writing for various media platforms with practice in the multi-media creation of original works; experience in writing forms and content typical of various media and criteria for evaluating written work; discussion of career opportunities. Prereq.: CMTM 250 or 260

CMTM 367: News Writing

This course will take students through the basics of news writing and reporting. The course will demand in-class writing assignments that will help students prioritize information and write with accuracy under deadline. Students will discuss and be tested on current affairs and evaluate a variety of news sources. Students will cover local events and generate story ideas. Prereq.: CMTM 205

CMTM 368: Community Media

This course will familiarize students with the important journalistic function uniquely served by community-based media, a function increasingly important in today’s media landscape of centrally produced content controlled by fewer and fewer owners focused primarily on the economic needs of those owners and the advertisers. This course will introduce students to different forms of community media - print, video, audio, and new technologies - and how these contribute to the building of community.

CMTM 370: Public Relations

Examination of the history, development, and practice of the public relations field with attention to the planning, implementation, and execution of public relations campaigns and the survey techniques and strategies used by public relations practitioners.

CMTM 371: American Cinema (Origins-1950)

An investigation of the evolution of American narrative film history from its beginnings to the end of World War II. This course introduces students to the creative and technological developments in a given time period and exposes them to a variety of ways of analyzing American films. Films are investigated according to their historical, technological, aesthetic, and ideological significance as well as their genre placement. 

CMTM 372: American Cinema (1950-Present)

An investigation of the evolution of American narrative film history from the end of World War II to the present. This course introduces students to the creative and technological developments in a given time period and exposes them to a variety of ways of analyzing American films. Films are investigated according to their historical, technological, aesthetic, and ideological significance as well as their genre placement. 

CMTM 373: World Cinema

An examination of the major influential film movements and filmmakers from around the world and their impact on the language of cinema. This course is intended to develop an understanding of the evolution of narrative film history by analyzing films according to their historical, technological, aesthetic, and ideological significance. 

CMTM 374: Special Topics in Film (Rotating Topics)

This revolving topics course provides exposure to a variety of topics that will give students studying film the opportunity to engage in broader, as well as more in-depth investigations of the history, concepts, and theoretical approach to film studies and the body scholarship in this field. Consult the Schedule of Classes for specific topics. Recent examples include Film Genre, Film Authorship, the Films of Kathryn Bigelow, and Teen Movies. 

CMTM 374A: Studies in Film: American Horror Film

As one of the revolving topics in the Studies in Film coure, this class will introduce the history, evolution, and important themes of the American horror film, serving as an overview of the genre and locating it in American historical, cultural, and literary contexts. Approaches will include close readings of films as well as psychoanalytic, ideological, and feminist analyses. A number of films and clips will be screened and discussed in the context of course readings. 

CMTM 375: Contemporary Hispanic Cinema

An introduction to some of the major contemporary films and filmmakers from Spain and Latin American countries. This course will not only analyze the artistic merits of the films but also examine the social, economic, historical, and political context within which they were created and how their themes are related to national identity as well as international concerns. 

CMTM 376: Television History

An overview of the cultural history of television from its origins in radio to cable and satellite communication, primarily in the U.S. but with some comparison to international contexts. Television programs are the primary focus and will be used to explore topics such as technology, regulation, audience measurement, commercial and educational/public broadcasting, advertising, and programming strategies.

CMTM 377: Gender and Media

This course examines representations of gender and sexuality in popular media. Students will begin with feminist theories of representation and follow theoretical developments that include issues of race, ethnicity, masculinity, and queer theory as they relate to film, television, and new media. 

CMTM 378: New Media Technologies

This course explores emerging media technologies, including descriptions of the technologies, how their implementation affects existing media institutions, and social implications of the technologies. Emphasis is on historical perspectives on emerging media technologies in the global information society including digital audio-visual media, computers and consumer electronics, and various networking technologies. The course provides students with an understanding of the background, structure, functions, and current status for each technology. Emerging convergent media revolutionizing the global knowledge system will also be covered, including deregulatory policies, corporate mergers, and industrial restructuring.

CMTM 379: Media Law & Ethics

This course introduces students to the study of legal and ethical issues affecting U.S. mass media from journalistic and business perspectives. Specifically, the course will explore the legal and ethical responsibilities and rights of communicators and media professionals across various issues, including the First Amendment, defamation, privacy, newsgathering, regulation over media content, intellectual property rights, and regulation of electronic media and advertising industry. It will also help students think through media issues from a moral reasoning perspective by taking a variety of cases through an ethical framework.

CMTM 380A: Topics in Television: Television Genres

Television genres will cover a variety of scholarly approaches to the study of television programs. Genres can be studied for how they change over time, in response to cultural changes or economic exigencies. This course will take up theoretical questions of televisuality (the aesthetic conditions of the television text), and then focus on a number of particular genres. We will be primarily focusing on U.S. television, but there will be some attention to global questions, especially those of flow and format.

CMTM 383: Professional Internship 1

Professional activities in a selected field of media, performed and supervised at public or private facilities, corporations, businesses, agencies, etc. Application process required.

CMTM 384: Professional Internship 2

Professional activities in a selected field of media, performed and supervised at public or private facilities, corporations, businesses, agencies, etc. Application process required.

CMTM 385: Professional Internship 3

Professional activities in a selected field of media, performed and supervised at public or private facilities, corporations, businesses, agencies, etc. Application process required.

CMTM 390: NEIU Cinémathèque 

A “cinémathèque” is a small, specialized theater where important films are screened, discussed, archived, preserved, and loved. Drawing upon the tradition of cinémathèques across the world, this course will provide an opportunity for students to screen, discuss, and research important works of cinema here at Northeastern Illinois University. With oncampus resources such as 35mm prints screened by the Chicago Film Society and our extensive holdings of the Criterion Collection in the Ronald Williams Library, students will learn about the material practices surrounding film such as archival collection, preservation, and restoration as well as distribution, exhibition, criticism, and reception. Junior or Senior-level standing only.

CMTM 410: Indepenent Study in Media 

Individual investigation into selected topics in theory and practice of media. Independent studies require the approval of the instructor, Department Chair, and the appropriate College Dean(s).

CMTM 465: Mass Communication Theory

This course is designed to investigate the concepts, ideologies, and resulting scholarship that are relevant to the study of mass communication. Students will study a variety of mass communication theories and will critically evaluate the merits of these perspectives. Students will develop research projects to further interpret and utilize mass communication theories.

CMTM 466: Media and Cultural Studies

This graduate seminar is designed to expose students to a "cultural studies" approach to media. Cultural studies scholars are primarily concerned with issues of power, and this approach has long informed the discipline of media studies. The focus on media and will explore structures of power and inequality as they relate to the politics of identity and experience. Drawing upon foundational readings in the field as well as current media and cultural studies scholarship, students will spend the semester exploring the way in which these structures of power materialize in media texts and industrial formations. 

CMTM 467: Special Topics in Film and Television (Rotating Topics)

This special topics course provides graduate students an opportunity to explore historical and theoretical approaches specific to studies of film and television. Special topics may include film history and theory, television history, national cinemas, genres, industrial technologies and trends, and issues of representation such as race, class, and gender. Recent examples include “Reality Television.”

CMTM 468: Seminar in New Media

This course is an opportunity to explore critical approaches to “new media” through historical and theoretical readings. It intends to provide students with a better understanding of debates surrounding contemporary digital media while also giving them the ability to frame these debates within appropriate historical and cultural contexts.

Theatre Course Descriptions

CMTT 109: First Year Experience: Staging Chicago - Performances In, For, & About Chicago

In Staging Chicago students will read, watch, write, and perform plays about Chicago. Special attention will be paid to plays that premiered in Chicago and were produced by Chicago artists. In addition to reading plays, students will have an opportunity to stage scenes and present their own theatrical interpretation of the Second City. 

CMTT 130: Introduction to Theatre

Survey of the components of theatrical experience and the function of the various contributors to theatrical production. Attendance at selected theatrical productions is required.

CMTT 203: Voice for the Stage

This course gives each student a method to improve his or her ability to articulate, project, develop resonance, and meet the demands for the stage including dialects and Shakespearean speech.

CMTT 207: Interpreter’s Laboratory

Participation in oral interpretation activities at local, regional, or national levels. Communication, Media, and Theatre majors may repeat this course once for laboratory credit toward graduation requirements. Prereq.: CMTT 255 or consent of instructor

CMTT 220: Improvisation

Emphasis on mastering improvisational theatre games for both actor training and performance.

CMTT 221: Acting 1

The basic skills of acting including the actor’s internal preparation for playing a role and the development of his/her external technique for projecting the role to the audience.

CMTT 239: Theatre Practicum

Practical, hands-on experience in all technical areas of theatre for main stage productions.

CMTT 240: Stagecraft

An introduction to all aspects of backstage technical production.

CMTT 242: Costume Construction

Students will learn theatrical costume construction techniques through the study of basic fabric handling, pattern cutting, hand and machine sewing, and fabric dying. Students will also learn costume care and storage. 

CMTT 249: Makeup

Fundamentals of stage and television makeup for straight and character roles; emphasis on the application of makeup, historical periods, and uses of masks.

CMTT 255: Performance of Literature

Development of intellectual and emotional responsiveness to prose, poetry, and drama, and the ability to communicate effectively in performance.

CMTT 309: Independent Study in Theatre

Individual investigation of a topic of the student’s choice. Requires approval of the instructor, Department Chair, and the Dean.

CMTT 321: Acting 2

Refinement of skills developed in Acting 1 with emphasis on the use of improvisation to develop and project characters from standard plays. Prereq.: CMTT 221 or equivalent

CMTT 331: History of Theatre 1

Chronological survey of the development of theatre and drama of the Western World from the early Greek festivals to the early Renaissance period.

CMTT 332: History of Theatre 2

Chronological survey of the development of theatre and drama of the Western World from the Renaissance period to the twentieth century.

CMTT 333: Contemporary Theatre

This course provides a survey of theatre and drama from the twentieth century to the present.  

CMTT 334: Special Topics in Theatre

In-depth study of the major works of a single dramatist or movement, the relationship of those works to the period in which they were produced, and their place in the history of dramatic literature. Consult the Schedule of Classes for specific topics. Recent topics have included "Political Theatre" and "Queer Performance."

CMTT 335: American Social Problem Plays

In-depth study of American plays in the 20th century that reflect the political and social changes in society. Plays will be analyzed in relation to the literary text, theatrical texts in their historical and social context, and social issues through literature.

CMTT 336: Realism and Naturalism

A survey of realism and naturalism in drama and theatre from the late 19th century to the present, covering major plays, playwrights, and theatre practitioners.

CMTT 337: Women Playwrights

Chronological study and analysis of literary texts in historical and social contexts that are written by women, that deal with social issues about women, and are about women’s rights.

CMTT 338: Melodrama

An exploration of melodrama as the dramatic form that dominated the nineteenth century stage in the United States. The course focuses on identifying the characteristics of melodrama and contemporaneous theatre practice, reading representative plays, and exploring the social and political issues of the day reflected in the plays.

CMTT 339: Advanced Theatre Practicum

Special assignment to specific positions such as stage management, direction, and dramaturge, among others. 

CMTT 340: Set Design

Comprehensive study of the principles of scene design theory and practice.Prereq.: CMTT 130

CMTT 341: Lighting Design

Comprehensive study of the principles of lighting design theory and practical application. Prereq.: CMTT 130

CMTT 342: Costume Design

In-depth study of the basic design skills, identification of textiles, as well as analysis of dramatic texts for costuming and coordinating designs with a theatre production team. Prereq.: CMTT 130

CMTT 343: Stage Management

In-depth study of the job of the Stage Manager, including production planning, prompt book design, scheduling and managing rehearsal time, and actually stage managing and calling a show. 

CMTT 345: Directing

Principles and techniques of the director’s art. Prereq.: CMTT 130

CMTT 346: American Musical Theatre

Survey of the development of the American musical theatre with consideration of the problems inherent in the production of musicals.

CMTT 347: Playwriting

Study of the dramatic art with practice in the writing of plays for dramatic production. An attempt will be made to provide laboratory productions of outstanding student works.

CMTT 348: Advanced Stagecraft

Advanced methods in backstage technical production. Prereq: CMTT 240.

CMTT 349: Summer Theatre

A laboratory class covering all phases of theatre production in conjunction with the production of a play script. Includes acting, directing, set and costume design, choreography, lighting, props, publicity, and theatre management as related to the production of a play script.

CMTT 350: Children’s Theatre Workshop - Elementary

Survey of theatre for children from creative dramatics to theatre in elementary schools. All significant facets of play production are covered in performance of an actual script.

CMTT 351: Children’s Theatre Workshop - Middle & High School

Survey of theatre for children, from creative dramatics to theatre in the secondary schools. All significant facets of play production are covered in performance of an actual script.

CMTT 355: Advanced Performance of Literature

Literary analysis of poetry and prose; presentation of individual and multiple performers. Prereq.: CMTT 255

CMTT 357: Interpretation of Shakespeare

Selected comedies, tragedies, and histories; tracing the development of the dramatist; emphasis on special performance techniques to illuminate a thorough study of the plays. Prereq.: CMTT 255

CMTT 358: Acting 3

Advanced methods in acting including analyzing language and approaching language problems in theatre production. Scene work is taken from classic dramas. Prereq.: CMTT 321 or equivalent

CMTT 359: Experimental Theatre

In this course, students will study and perform experimental modes of theatre. Methods may include collaborative devising, verbatim theatre, playback theatre, physical theatre, relational performance, solo storytelling, game theatre, and live art techniques. 

CMTT 383: Professional Internship 1

Professional activities in a selected field of theatre, performed and supervised at public or private facilities, theatres, organizations, schools, etc. Requires application process.

CMTT 384: Professional Internship 2

Professional activities in a selected field of theatre, performed and supervised at public or private facilities, theatres, organizations, schools, etc. Requires application process.

CMTT 385: Professional Internship 3

Professional activities in a selected field of theatre, performed and supervised at public or private facilities, theatres, organizations, schools, etc. Requires application process.

CMTT 392: Integrating the Arts Across Disciplines: Art As a Tool for Teaching & Training

This course instructs aspiring leaders in the fields of education, business, science, and the arts in utilizing the skills of collaboration, innovation, and project management employed across the disciplines as tools for teaching, training, creativity, and innovation. This experiential course delivers the fundamental concepts and pedagogy of creative leadership through field experience, guest interviews, and documentation projects. 

CMTT 393: Drama for Teaching and Learning

Development of leadership in conducing creative dramatic programs to serve the needs of children from grades one through twelve.

CMTT 423: Independent Study in Theatre

Individual investigation into selected topics in methods and materials for dramatic activities.

CMTT 430: Dramatic Theory

This course offers an analysis of major theories of dramatic writing and dramatic production from Aristotle to contemporary theorists, and explores how these theories influence theatre and drama.

CMTT 431: Comparative Performing Arts

This course compares various examples and methodologies of adaptation in performing arts such as ballet, opera, drama, film, and television. Students are required to attend performances.  

CMTT 446: Theatre Management

Managerial policies and practices in educational and community theatres with emphasis upon common problems and solutions.

CMTT 473: Special Topics in Theatre: Rotating Topics

This revolving topics course allows graduate students the opportunity to study in-depth, specific theatre methods, movements, and motivators. Consult the Schedule of Classes for specific topics. Recent examples include: “Directors,” “Gender and Performance,” “Battlefields,” "Arts and Activism," and "Tragedy and Society."

Graduate Education Courses:

CMTE 490: Instructional Communication

Selected topics in methods and materials related to speaking and listening; instructional problems relative to type of programs, trends in instruction, sources, resources and research. Individual projects will adapt resources and methodology to a particular type of school and classroom, such as the inner city.

CMTE 492: Teaching College Speech

This course examines the tasks of the communication teacher; philosophy, objectives, materials and methods of instruction, communication curricula and departmental operations; and professional relationships in the community.

Communication, Media and Theatre

Faculty Profiles

T (773) 442-5950

cmt@neiu.edu

Faculty Profiles

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