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Personal Safety Tips

Do not allow the opportunity for a crime to occur. Avoid placing yourself in environments where criminals will have the opportunity to commit a personal crime.

  • Always keep your doors and windows locked.
  • If possible, let a friend or family member know where and with whom you will be and when you will be back when you go out.
  • Trust your instincts. If you feel uncomfortable about someone near you on the street, in an elevator or getting off a bus, head for a populated place or yell for help.
  • Use well-lit and busy sidewalks.
  • Avoid walking alone or walking near vacant lots, alleys, construction sites, and wooded areas.
  • Learn the locations of emergency phones on campus.
  • Carry a cell phone, whistle or a personal alarm to alert people that you need help.
  • Stand near the controls in an elevator. If you feel threatened, hit the alarm and as many floor buttons as you can.
  • When you are on a bus, sit as near the driver as possible.
  • Try to park in an area that will be well lit and heavily traveled when you return.
  • Lock your car doors and roll up the windows completely, even if you are only running a quick errand.
  • Drink alcohol responsibly. Remember your ability to respond is diminished by over-consumption of alcohol.
  • Stay alert at all times and call the police immediately to report suspicious activity.
  • Never leave your personal property unattended (e.g., book bags, laptop computers, etc.).
  • Put ICE (In Case of Emergency) in your cell phone, along with a name and telephone number of a loved one, to enable emergency services personnel to contact your family in the event of an emergency.
  • Unplug yourself and tune in to your immediate environment. Excessive volume or use of electronic devices (iPods, PDAs, cell phones, etc.) distracts you from being alert to potential safety issues.
  • Utilize crosswalks at all times and obey the signals at intersections when walking. Under Illinois law, as a pedestrian, you DO NOT have the right of way until you establish yourself in the crosswalk. If you are crossing at any location other than a crosswalk, you MUST yield to vehicular traffic.
  • When driving, be alert for pedestrians and bicyclists and yield to them when required by law.

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